rules of excellence chip in

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4356

Senior Member
Russian
Hello, dear experts. Could you explain the meaning and possibly rephrase the following excerpt from a critique?

"...where do acknowledged rules of excellence chip in?"

It's right in the middle of this paragraph:

"There are pursed lips as Bake Off returns. The great British judges know who makes a good madeira cake – and who instantly becomes the bookies’ favourite. After all, they have standards. But here – in a swirl of sloppy chocolate mousse – is an abiding problem for all who seek to judge anything from gastro-ambition to literary acceptance: where do acknowledged rules of excellence chip in? <---->

Do I get it right that said rules refer to the professional qualities of culinary critics necessary to judge restaurants and dishes and then how should "chip in" be interpreted? Perhaps "of use"? What do you think?

<----> Sentences removed to comply with 4-sentence limit on quotations. See Rule 4. Cagey, moderator.
 
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  • ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I - a US speaker - would use "to chip in" to mean "to contribute", as when one adds a chip to the pot in poker. In the context (as I see it), we'd say, on my side of the Atlantic, "to kick in", to enter into play.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree. We all chipped in £1 to buy Helen a present. I wouldn't use chip in to mean come into play. Was this the Peter Preston article in the Observer? I find his style of writing somewhat wayward.
     

    4356

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, it's his article I encountered on the Guardian website. Thank you a lot, ain'ttranslationfun? and rhitagawr!
     
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