Rules of old English

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  • lasirena

    Senior Member
    US English
    haha. that site is great! and...i never realized that old english had such complex conjugations! ;)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Basic rule of thumb:

    -st for second person singular, -th for third person singular

    I speak, thou speakest, he/she speaketh, we speak, ye speak, they speak

    "To be" and "to have" are, of cousre, irregular:
    I am, thou art, he/she is, we are, ye are, they are
    I have, thou hast, he/she hath, we have, ye have, they have

    I'm not entirely sure about the past tense...

    I spake, thou spakest, he/she spake (or spaketh?), we spake, ye spake, they spake
     

    Gerardo

    New Member
    Guatemala (espanish)
    [
    "To be" and "to have" are, of cousre, irregular:
    I am, thou art, he/she is, we are, ye are, they are
    I have, thou hast, he/she hath, we have, ye have, they have
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    An Boring Old Fart writeth thiswise:

    Conjugations of the pattern

    I have, thou hast, he hath, we/you/they have

    may be "old English", but they are not Old English. That verb went:

    ic hæbbe
    þū hafas (hafast / hæfst)
    hē hafaþ (hæfþ)
    wē habbaþ
    gē habbaþ
    hīo habbaþ [þ = modern 'th']

    in Old English.

    "Thou hast", "he hath" are examples of Early Modern English (in general use until around 1800).

    F
     

    Jonegy

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    a
    Focalist said:
    An Boring Old Fart writeth thiswise:

    Conjugations of the pattern

    I have, thou hast, he hath, we/you/they have

    may be "old English", but they are not Old English. That verb went:

    ic hæbbe
    þū hafas (hafast / hæfst)
    hē hafaþ (hæfþ)
    wē habbaþ
    gē habbaþ
    hīo habbaþ [þ = modern 'th']

    in Old English.


    "Thou hast", "he hath" are examples of Early Modern English (in general use until around 1800).

    F

    How I wish I had the turn of phrase you have mastered.
    Yours comes across as sweet sarcasm - " the crack" as we would say

    Mine always seems serious --- ( and I do not have a serious bone in ny body)

    Apart from the "Funny Bone"

    The Cork side of the family does not seem to have crossed the devide.
     
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