run low/be short of

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello everyone


My question is related to the idioms "run low" and "be short of". Here is the thing: When I want to say something is running out, can I use the pronoun "I" as the subject? This way:

"the car is running low on gas" --> can I say "I am running low on gas/I am short of gas"?
and
"my cellphone battery is running low" --> Can I say "I am running low/short of battery"?

Thank you so much
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Interesting question. For case 1) I would say it's fine to use "I" (I would say short on gas).

    But for the battery, I'd make "battery" the subject, otherwise it seems odd to me.
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Excuse me.

    Just out of curiosity, how about this sentence: I have got Vitamin D deficiency?
    Is it possible to say "I'm short of Vitamin D" by using a first-person?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I'm going to hope that is enough "on-topic" since it is related.

    The first person is fine, but "short" doesn't sound idiomatic, though I can see why you would think so.

    I'd say "I'm low on vitamin D" (this is for the deficiency).

    Oddly enough, if you say "I am running low on vitamin D" or "I am short on vitamin D" it means that you need to go to the market and get some more. You are almost out of it in your medicine cabinet. :)
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Interesting question. For case 1) I would say it's fine to use "I" (I would say short on gas).

    But for the battery, I'd make "battery" the subject, otherwise it seems odd to me.
    And if I say "I am running out of gas" .. Does that still sound odd?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    That sounds fine in your gas context. (People in my neck of the woods say that. :)).

    [on the phone in a vehicle having a conversation] Hey, wait a sec. I'm running out of gas*, so I'm going to pull into a gas station. I'll call you back in a few. (Partly slang, I think.)

    *Or, "I'm short on gas" / "I'm running low on gas".
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    That sounds fine in your gas context. (People in my neck of the woods say that. :)).

    [on the phone in a vehicle having a conversation] Hey, wait a sec. I'm running out of gas*, so I'm going to pull into a gas station. I'll call you back in a few. (Partly slang, I think.)

    *Or, "I'm short on gas" / "I'm running low on gas".
    Thank you so much, Perpend!!
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Interesting question. For case 1) I would say it's fine to use "I" (I would say short on gas).

    But for the battery, I'd make "battery" the subject, otherwise it seems odd to me.
    and what should I say? "My cellphone's/or cellphone battery is running low/or is low?
     
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