Run out a battery (make it lose its power)

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Xavier da Silva, Sep 15, 2017.

  1. Xavier da Silva

    Xavier da Silva Senior Member

    Hello everyone,

    Does "run out" + ''battery'' meaning "use a battery and make it lose its power" sound natural/correct in the examples I made below?

    a. John, stop watching so many videos or you'll run out the battery. We'll need it later and there will be nowhere to charge it where we'll be.
    b. Now I know who is running out my phone battery! Anna, stop using mom's phone so much. It is old and the battery dies fast.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    Run down. The battery runs out, but a person or a use runs it down.
     
  3. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    "run out" + ''battery'' meaning "use a battery and make it lose its power" :cross:
    "run out" mean "to lose all its power" (or more broadly - "lose all of the thing that is in it.")
    "To run out" (a short form of "to run out of charge/power.") is intransitive - it cannot have an object.
    "You'll run out the battery." "Battery" is the object of the verb "to run out", therefore the sentence is wrong.

    a. John, stop watching so many videos or the battery will run out. :thumbsup: No object.
     
  4. Xavier da Silva

    Xavier da Silva Senior Member

    Thank you all very much.

    So now instead of "run out" I'll use "run down" in my (a) and (b) examples.
     
  5. While I think "run down" is what most people would use here, as an alternative more colloquially you might encounter is "wear out"

    (To exhaust something or someone from overuse and abuse)

    Used for batteries, tires, clothes, and people.:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017

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