run your welcome

Pavel Pin

Senior Member
Telugu
In a Town called Lago, people was hired Stacey and his two cousins. These three people somehow got arrested and Later released after serving some years in Jail. One day, resident of the town, Stacey met this three people. Actually Stacey got injured by The Stranger who hired by Town to protect them.

Stacey: Well, I am doing something, Morg. Sitting here watching you bleed to death.

Morgan: Stacey, things have changed in Lago.

Stacey: You need me.

Morgan: I gotta tell you about it.

Stacey: Yeah. From the looks of your arm, Morg, it looks like you've run your welcome out in Lago, and ours, too.

What is the meaning of "run your welcome"?

Source: High Plains Drifter (1973)
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    run your welcome out = overstay your welcome / wear out your welcome (this last is the most common form you'll hear)

    To run out <something> is to use it all up, go beyond its maximum, e.g. "He hooked that fish and it ran out 100 yards of fishing line and then it broke – that was all the line he had on the reel."
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Hi,
    run your welcome out = overstay your welcome / wear out your welcome (this last is the most common form you'll hear)
    :confused:
    Could you please explain the meaning of this phrase by some different example? I understand the meaning of "run out", but I'm having trouble understanding what "run one's welcome out" really means.:(
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    :confused:
    Could you please explain the meaning of this phrase by some different example? I understand the meaning of "run out", but I'm having trouble understanding what "run one's welcome out" really means.:(
    It means to "wear out your welcome," which is a set expression. If someone invites you to spend the weekend at their home, when you arrive, they might say, "Welcome to our home!" That's your welcome.

    But then you spend two days eating all their food, drinking all their alcohol, making disparaging remarks about their cat, putting your feet on the tables, not making your bed, not helping to wash the dishes, and just generally acting like you're in a hotel, rather than in a friend's home. At that point, your hosts are probably thinking that you're "wearing out your welcome," just as you might wear out a pair of shoes, so that they're no longer usable.

    To "run your welcome out" means the same thing, but you might only find it in High Plains Drifter – it's not a regular expression, like "to wear out your welcome" is.

    Does that help?
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    It means to "wear out your welcome," which is a set expression. If someone invites you to spend the weekend at their home, when you arrive, they might say, "Welcome to our home!" That's your welcome.

    But then you spend two days eating all their food, drinking all their alcohol, making disparaging remarks about their cat, putting your feet on the tables, not making your bed, not helping to wash the dishes, and just generally acting like you're in a hotel, rather than in a friend's home. At that point, your hosts are probably thinking that you're "wearing out your welcome," just as you might wear out a pair of shoes, so that they're no longer usable.

    To "run your welcome out" means the same thing, but you might only find it in High Plains Drifter – it's not a regular expression, like "to wear out your welcome" is.

    Does that help?
    I get it now. Thanks so much.
    I think it wouldn't be said on the guest's face because it would be rude to do so; the host would only think of it in their head.
    Perhaps it's another way of saying "Get out of my house, you bastard!":D
    Right?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think "to wear out your welcome" is at the opposite (and most polite) end of the spectrum, while your suggestion is at the other end. The hosts know you'll be leaving Sunday night and their pain will be over. Yes, they would be thinking it, or use the expression to summarize your behavior in speaking to the other friends.
     
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