Russian: cursive letter "т" (m)

  • ahvalj

    Senior Member
    In the 18th and early 19th centuries, this shape was also used in print, compare this grammar printed in 1755. In pre-typographic times, this was also in use as a variant. I guess it represents an evolution from the regular T via this and this shape (note in the latter case how the height of lateral outgrowths varies in individual instances of T).

    By the way, while the variant you mention is taught in school, many (most?) kids eventually change it some time at middle school into a plain italic т.
     
    Last edited:

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Looks like an individual ornate way of writing (i. e. the italic т I mentioned but with embellishments).
    I think you are right.
    It is actually not from a Russian text, but from some handwritten letters from Macedonia during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I wondered if this style/shape of handwritten т was usual in Russian handwritten texts too.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    By the way, while the variant you mention is taught in school, many (most?) kids eventually change it some time at middle school into a plain italic т.
    It is, however, commonly used in printed italicized texts, even in textbooks for beginner learners of Russian. There are at least two such books available in Hungary and neither of them explains why торт becomes mорm. :)
    The letter "д" is even more curious with its three different lowercase versions.
     
    Last edited:

    sotos

    Senior Member
    Greek
    To add some info on byzantine calligraphic T, it is very common as initial decorated letter in manuscripts, because many gospel chapters start with ΤΩ ΚΑΙΡΩ ΕΚΕΙΝΩ ... (At that time ...) .
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top