Russian transliteration: X

modgirl

Senior Member
USA English
I've noticed that many words transliterated into Latin letters employ KS instead of X.

Is there any particular reason?

For instance, the female name Alexandra in English is usually spelled (just from my experience) Aleksandra by Russians.
 
  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Unlike our own, the Cyrillic alphabet does not have a letter for the sound [ks]. To write it, Russians have to use two letters, one for [k] and another for [s] ('KC', in Cyrillic capitals).
     

    modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Outsider said:
    Unlike our own, the Cyrillic alphabet does not have a letter for the sound [ks]. To write it, Russians have to use two letters, one for [k] and another for [s].

    I understand, but I guess they just carry the KC in Cyrillic over to a KS in English without thinking about using the X.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Some authors do transliterate with an 'x'. However, using 'ks' has some advantages:

    - it's formally closer to how the word is spelled in Russian;
    - it avoids mispronunciations. For example, 'Alexandra' is pronounced with x=[ks] in Russian, but with x=[gz] in English.
     

    Lev Yakupov

    Member
    Russia/Russian
    Im afraid to use 'x' instead of 'ks', 'cuz in russian 'x' pronounce like 'h' in house. So Alexandra for me would be something like that: Alehandra :)

    Another examples, we wrote kseroks[ксерокс] for xerox, kodeks[кодекс] for codex, tekst[текст] for text, etc...
     

    martinemussies

    Senior Member
    the Netherlands ~ Dutch.
    Lev Yakupov said:
    Another examples, we wrote kseroks[ксерокс] for xerox, kodeks[кодекс] for codex, tekst[текст] for text, etc...

    How many English words are actually translitterated and just added into
    the Russian language? I mean, words like cafe, computer, coffee, taxi etc.

    And how do you 'apply' your grammar on those words? Never heard anyone
    say "metroje" for example, it's always just "metro" even after a word like
    "okele" or "na".
     

    Lev Yakupov

    Member
    Russia/Russian
    How many English words are actually translitterated and just added into the Russian language?

    Heh, there a lot of it, especially in IT sphere or in other scientific areas.
    I got one dictionary @ home, with approximately 25000 entries in it. And im
    sure, that's not a whole list :)

    And how do you 'apply' your grammar on those words?
    Well, there are some typicall declensional endings (same for native words of course), which usually can being projected to foreign words. So your example with 'metro', which really invariably like 'cafe' & 'taxi', is more exception than a common thing:
    РабОтать за ноутбУком - work on notebook (laptop)
    ФутбОльный фанАт - Football fan
    etc...
     
    Top