Ruszt czy grill

KaMus

New Member
Polish
I have a quick question for those who grill in Poland. Do you make "kurczaka z rusztu" czy "kurczaka na grillu"? Do you say “idę zapalić pod rusztem” czy “idę zapalić grilla”?

I’m a little confused - obviously we have always had dishes like “kaczka z rusztu” but it seems that recently the word “grill” just took over? Is the Polish word “ruszt” still a common word, or is it ever used when we are talking about the grill? Or should I just say “grill”, “grillować” and “grillowany” from now on?

Looking at google images, it almost looked like “grill” is the entire grill, while “ruszt” refers to a “grill rack” - but it does not appear to be a definite distinction, especially since there is also a term “płyta grilla” - “grill rack” which appears on some online shopping websites offering such items for sale in Poland.

Can someone tell me if there is a semantic difference between the two words, and whether the word “ruszt” is becoming obsolete?

Thank you!
 
  • zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Looking at google images, it almost looked like “grill” is the entire grill, while “ruszt” refers to a “grill rack”
    Well 'ruszt' is indeed the grill rack, but I don't think natives would call it so in everyday speech. It's just the specific term for that item. I would still call that rack a 'grill' For example "Idź umyj grilla". Or possibly "Idź umyj kratkę z grilla".

    This is a "szczotka do czyszczenia grilla" or "szczotka do czyszczenia rusztu z grilla"
    33691


    Do you make "kurczaka z rusztu" czy "kurczaka na grillu"?
    I would say 'Kurczak pieczony na grillu' or 'Kurczak pieczony z grilla'

    Do you say “idę zapalić pod rusztem” czy “idę zapalić grilla”?
    We say "idę rozpalić grilla"


    Can someone tell me if there is a semantic difference between the two words, and whether the word “ruszt” is becoming obsolete?
    "Ruszt" is still used, when me mean this kind of cooking. It is a "prosiak pieczony na ruszcie"
    33690
     
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    KaMus

    New Member
    Polish
    Thank you! So what it looks like is that in everyday use "grill" is the way to go. I appreciate you explaining the difference between the two terms though, because now I can see that it's not just that "ruszt" is being replaced by "grill" - there is a semantic difference between the two words, and that "ruszt", well, it's just something of the past! I think it would be rare to see a whole pig grilling in someone's backyard, although a restaurant might still serve a "prosiak pieczony na ruszcie." That makes sense. Thank you for the pictures!
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think it would be rare to see a whole pig grilling in someone's backyard, although a restaurant might still serve a "prosiak pieczony na ruszcie." That makes sense. Thank you for the pictures!
    Yeah, it is quite popular here to order such pigs at wedding parties.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No tak, zgadza się. Poprawka....prosiak z różna :)

    Though widzę, ze niektórzy tak mówią...choć pewnie mylą like I did.

    1569168939092.png



    1569169017523.png
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    Indeed, albeit "ruszt" is still used in many contexts as a technical term, it's being increasingly replaced by "grill" since nineties, where garden grills became fasionable. The word made tremendous career, even in terms of cars, one of front elements of the cars was renamed from "atrapa" to "grill".
     

    haes

    Member
    Polish - Poland
    Ruszt is just the metal grate with bars, used to grill meat, etc. Grill, at least the popular meaning of it nowadays is whole equipment used to roast meat, including ruszt itself. "Grill" is also used as a noun denoting whole process, time spent with friends etc. Grill is somewhat popular word in modern Polish, while ruszt is fairly or even very rare (literature plus other books, including cooking books). On my private scale of rarity from 1 to 10 (1 most common, 10 rarest), grill would be 3 (used in newspapers, media, frequently) and ruszt probably 8 or 9 (almost never seen nowadays)
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Ruszt is just the metal grate with bars, used to grill meat, etc. Grill, at least the popular meaning of it nowadays is whole equipment used to roast meat, including ruszt itself. "Grill" is also used as a noun denoting whole process, time spent with friends etc. Grill is somewhat popular word in modern Polish, while ruszt is fairly or even very rare (literature plus other books, including cooking books). On my private scale of rarity from 1 to 10 (1 most common, 10 rarest), grill would be 3 (used in newspapers, media, frequently) and ruszt probably 8 or 9 (almost never seen nowadays)
    It is really true that ruszt is slowly waning away, but I think that it can still be found in the menus of more luxurious restaurants with a long tradition.
    Wikipedia article does not mention ruszt as a kitchen device at all, only the technical use in furnaces and stoves.
    For me ruszt is still associated with a restaurant kitchen, while grill is an outdoor thing, used in private parties but I still speak the Polish of the 1960-s.

    By the way, I strongly doubt that chicken is really "grilled" (which would be very impractical). I think that "kurczak z grilla" is actually roasted on a spit in an electric oven with rotating elements.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Btw, the word ruszt (in Czech rošt) is a loanword from German: der Rost, Fleisch auf dem Rost braten (péci maso na roštu);

    rożen = spit, a pointed rod on which meat is impaled for roasting (in Czech rožeň, péci prase/berana/jehně na rožni);

    in Czech, rošt is also a technical term (not only in connection with furnaces), basically any (metal or wooden) grid used as a base;
    e.g. postelový rošt = bed base, in German der Bettenrost;
     
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