's or nothing with titles

Renatrix

Senior Member
polski
When you give the title of a journal + noun, should you use 's or nothing?
Examples:
'Psychology Today's Editor-in-Chief' or 'Psychology Today Editor-in-Chief'?
'Education Journal's Editorial Staff' or 'Education Journal Editorial Staff'?
I would like to avoid 'editor-in-chief of' or 'editorial staff of' since I'm not going to use the above in sentences but rather as description of functions.
Also, should 'the' precede these expressions?
 
  • Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    1. A journal has a website with guidelines for authors who want to publish in it. At the end, the name of the editor-in-chief is given (e.g. John Smith, PhD, Journal Name('s) Editor-in-Chief).
    2. Editor-in-chief's responsibilities are listed in the guidelines (e.g. (The?) Journal Name('s) Editor-in-Chief is responsible for handling correspondence with reviewers.)
    3. Authors are asked to submit their manuscripts to (the) Journal Name('s) Editor-in-Chief.
    4. Ms XXX is a member of (the) Journal Name('s) Editorial Staff.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    In continuous text, you could use various forms, including:

    Yesterday, I met John Smith, PhD, Journal Name's Editor-in-Chief).

    But in a list of names and functions such as you describe, I would suggest:

    John Smith, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Journal Name.



    Among other considerations, I have an instinctive aversion to "interfering" with the actual title of the journal (such as appending with 's).

    It may make skim-reading more difficult. eg Journal of Fishing's seems ugly to me, but I suppose it's just my personal opinion

    I haven't checked what Harvard of Chicago or equivalent style guides say about this.
     
    Last edited:

    Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    There's one more thing that I should mention: the journal('s?) name won't be English so 's might look even uglier... (e.g. Człowiek i Ziemia's Editor-in-Chief).
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It doesn't matter in the slightest what language is used for the publication title. If you mean 'the editor of Człowiek i Ziemia' he is 'Człowiek i Ziemia's editor'.

    If it is on a journal's website you wouldn't need to write 'Hunting Today's Editor-in-Chief'. It's obvious that the Editor-in-Chief referred to at the bottom of the page is not 'Vogue's E-in-C'.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In continuous text, you could use various forms, including:

    Yesterday, I met John Smith, PhD, Journal Name's Editor-in-Chief).

    But in a list of names and functions such as you describe, I would suggest:

    John Smith, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Journal Name.
    :thumbsup:

    It doesn't matter in the slightest what language is used for the publication title. If you mean 'the editor of Człowiek i Ziemia' he is 'Człowiek i Ziemia's editor'.

    If it is on a journal's website you wouldn't need to write 'Hunting Today's Editor-in-Chief'. It's obvious that the Editor-in-Chief referred to at the bottom of the page is not 'Vogue's E-in-C'.
    :thumbsup:

    And with your last example, I would say 'Ms XXX is a member of (the) Journal Name('s) editorial staff.' without the capitals in 'editorial staff'

    I would only include 'the' if it was part of the actual name of the publication. 'Ms XXX is a member of The Evening Star's editorial staff', or 'Ms XXX is a member of Squirrel-Spotting Monthly's editorial staff.'
     

    Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    Thanks a lot, everyone!
    It looks like the option without 's (Journal Name Editor-in-Chief, Journal Name Editorial Staff) is not popular with anyone. And yet I come accross such constructions as 'author declaration,' 'manuscript title,' 'journal name,' etc. I guess there are no rules as to when you can omit 's...
     
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