Sabbath, turn off the heat?

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ddubug

Senior Member
Korean
Hi,
I'm in secular environment.
I know wht the 'sabbath' is.

But I don't get this sentence.

<On the Sabbath, many turn off the heat so as not to engage in commerce with the electric company, which could be considered work.>

On the Sabbath, you shouldn't work. So many people turn off the heat
not to engage in commerce(TV Commercial? Why?) with the electric company, which could be considered work(watching TV commercial is work???).

I don't know....

Help....
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Well, they're receiving a service (heat) from the utility company and will eventually pay for it. Technically, they are buying something (trading, engaging in commerce) even though they won't pay for it until the end of the month.

    (I wonder why that argument doesn't apply to living in a house if they have a mortgage?)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi.

    From the WordReference dictionary:
    commerce = transactions (sales and purchases) having the objective of supplying commodities (goods and services)
    Selling and purchasing could be considered work (apparently not only if you do it for a living) so they're not using their radiators so that they don't trade/work.

    In some circles, turning on the TV is also forbidden on Sabbath day.

    EDIT: Biblio's too fast... :rolleyes:
    EDIT2: I'm honestly wondering exactly what is the connection between your first two sentences.
     

    ddubug

    Senior Member
    Korean
    OK, bibliolept...thank you. I've solved one. But why it is considered work? Because it's buying, trading?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Strict sabbatarians seek to avoid causing other people to work as well as avoiding work themselves.
    So they would not use any service or utility that relied on others working.
     

    Orpington

    Senior Member
    UK- English
    The Sabbath, in Christianity, is sacred because it was when G-d rested after creating the world. So some stricter Christians do not do any form of work on this day.

    It also exists in Judaism, where it falls on Saturday. It is normally called Shabbat though.
     

    Mr_Antares

    Senior Member
    US English
    I've never heard of "turning off the heat", but there are many Orthodox Jews who will not touch a light switch on Friday night (the Jewish Sabbath begins at sundown on Friday). There's some rabbinic rule about electricity being a form of "fire", which makes it out of bounds on the Sabbath.

    However, most of the people I've known who observe this rule don't wander around in the dark: they ask some other person (preferably a Gentile) to switch on the light.
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Observant (Orthodox) Jews use timers to turn lights, heat, or other appliances on or off during Shabbos (sundown on Friday until sundown on Saturday).
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Observant (Orthodox) Jews use timers to turn lights, heat, or other appliances on or off during Shabbos (sundown on Friday until sundown on Saturday).
    I hope this isn't straying off-topic, but just to underscore this point, we were recently shopping for a new oven. One of the features was a Sabbath Mode. When we looked into it we found out that it would keep the oven warm while in this mode but would not cook so that food could be cooked before the Sabbath and still be served warm on the Sabbath while avoiding the actual "work" of cooking. I thought that was fascinating.

    In this sense, it's also "turning off the heat", although it's distinguishing between cooking and keeping food warm.
     
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