Sablada

< Previous | Next >

Californian

Senior Member
English USA
My great grandmother (whose family was from Madeira and the Azores) made a dish she called "sablada." Sablada was when any left over food was mixed in a frying pan with fresh eggs. This dish was typically served as lunch.

My question: Does anyone know the correct spelling of the word "sablada?"

Thank you in advance for all your help. It is much appreciated!
 
  • Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    The dish you describe is traditionally called 'roupa velha' (old clothes) in mainland Portugal. I don't know about the Azores or Madeira. It's just a guess, but I think you are misspelling it. It's probably 'salada', which means salad in portuguese. A salad is, of course, mostly a mix of vegetables, but we also use the word to mean a dish made out of a mix of different foods, not just vegetables (or, indeed, even to mean any sort of mess or confusion). I believe there's nothing strange about calling a dish cooked out of leftovers 'salada', but then I may be wrong. Perhaps a native of the islands can show up with a better informed opinion.
     
    Last edited:

    Juno_Allure

    New Member
    English - RI & MA, USA
    I'm also of Portuguese decent (Açores) and had the same experience!
    My avó used to make a dish with thin steak, tomato sauce, onions and potatoes. She called it the same thing, phonetically, sablada!
    I did a little digging and the correct spelling of the word is 'sublatha' which apparently means 'with onions'.

    There's a recipe at eveningsedge.com

    Happy Cooking!
     

    GOODVIEW

    Senior Member
    Portugues brasileiro
    I'm also of Portuguese decent (Açores) and had the same experience!
    My avó used to make a dish with thin steak, tomato sauce, onions and potatoes. She called it the same thing, phonetically, sablada!
    I did a little digging and the correct spelling of the word is 'sublatha' which apparently means 'with onions'.

    There's a recipe at eveningsedge.com

    Happy Cooking!
    I think I've got it from your explanation. It is probably called "cebolada", meaning made with onions. It's just a guess but the word pronounced by a portuguese would sound much like sibulada, where the "u" is almost not pronounced.
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    You are most certainly right, Goodview. 'Cebolada' is exactly what Juno describes (by the way, welcome to the forum), but 'cebolada' is not made of leftovers, so it doesn't correspond to Californian's recipe. On it's way from the Islands to America, the name could have been changed, though, so what Californian's great grandmother called 'cebolada' may not be the same dish that we and Juno's grandmother call 'cebolada'.
     

    Juno_Allure

    New Member
    English - RI & MA, USA
    Please excuse my crappy Portuguese as I say
    Obrigado par a Bim-Vindo!

    It was one of my new years resolutions to learn all of my Avó's recipes. This was the first attempt. SUCCESS!

    I accidentally used Cilantro instead of Parsley...but it turned out great anyway.

    I felt like an 8 year old again; warm and full in my Avó's kitchen.

    Thanks for the clarification! It helped me find the right recipe card.
     

    Attachments

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Please excuse my crappy Portuguese as I say
    Obrigado par a Bim-Vindo pelas boas-vindas! Obrigada if you are a female

    It was one of my new years resolutions to learn all of my Avó's recipes. This was the first attempt. SUCCESS!

    I accidentally used Cilantro instead of Parsley...but it turned out great anyway.

    I felt like an 8 year old again; warm and full in my Avó's kitchen.

    Thanks for the clarification! It helped me find the right recipe card.
    That's it, Juno (I'm pretty sure of that, despite the small size photo), but, I insist, this is 'cebolada', not the leftovers dish Californian mentioned.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top