s'abreuver

rubes1

Senior Member
United States, English
J'ai regardé dans le dico et je vois que le mot "abreuver" peut dire inonder dans le sens figuratif... Mais je ne sais pas encore comment bien traduire "s'abreuver" dans ce contexte:

"Ils se sont abreuvés des écrits des Égyptiens Sayyed Qotb et Omar Abderahman et des prêches d'imams locaux virulents."

Could I just say they referred to? Though I'm not sure that's correct or strong enough...

Merci!
 
  • weefoot

    Senior Member
    France French
    That's right. Please note that it has a pejorative connotation, (as your context seems to prove). "S"abreuver de", when it refers to books, or theory, may imply that one has read it so much (and maybe nothing else), that one loses any critical point of view on it.
    I don't know if I am being clear ?
     

    rubes1

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    That's right. Please note that it has a pejorative connotation, (as your context seems to prove). "S"abreuver de", when it refers to books, or theory, may impliy that one has read it so much (and maybe nothing else), that one loses any critical point of view on it.
    I don't know if I am being clear ?
    Thank you both!

    Yes, what you are saying is very clear to me in the context.
     

    Jeanbar

    Senior Member
    France
    It is not always derogatory. One can say: "il s'est abreuvé aux meilleures sources" to talk about an educated person who read the best classical authors.
     

    pieanne

    Senior Member
    Belgium/French
    S'abreuver de could mean they absorbed exclusively and too much from one source, s'abreuver à could mean they took their information from one source
     

    Jeanbar

    Senior Member
    France
    My dictionnary does not make any difference between "s'abreuver de" and "s'abreuver à".
    However, abreuver qqun de qqch meant "make him believe" (1538) which is now outdated. There is a meaning "accabler" (overwhelm) still active to-day in 2 expressions: abreuver de douleur, abreuver qqun d'injures.

    So the initial sentence in French and weefoot's remark make it pretty clear.
     
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