sacking [sack / sac: chess]

NChonKaí

New Member
Colombian Spanish
According to chess GM Bobby Fisher, you have to "sack, sack and sack". Please, what did he mean?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum, NChonKaí. :)

    I believe that this definition of sack as a verb is the one you need:
    plunder and destroy (used chiefly in historical contexts).
    Does it make sense? Is he talking about defeating your opponent by taking as many men as possible? Please give us the complete sentence and tell us something about what is being discussed. We need this Context and Background to give an accurate answer. ;)
     

    Salvage

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In my chess playing we say what I would spell "sac" but pronounce as "sack," as a shorthand for "sacrifice".

    "He sacked his bishop and rook to force mate."

    My bet is that the citation is a report from an interview, an oral statement, that the recorder wrote as "sack."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In my chess playing we say what I would spell "sac" but pronounce as "sack," as a shorthand for "sacrifice".

    "He sacked his bishop and rook to force mate."

    My bet is that the citation is a report from an interview, an oral statement, that the recorder wrote as "sack."
    This is very interesting, and sounds much more likely. It then has the opposite meaning from the one I proposed. I hope that we can have more context from the original poster to confirm this answer (which I believe is correct),
     

    NChonKaí

    New Member
    Colombian Spanish
    Thanks Cagey. Thanks Salvage. I couldn't find the context, but Fisher was sicrificing two Bishops to force mate. Salvage is right. It is wrongly spelled. Sorry!! Spanish is my native language. Happy Holidays.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Yep, sack (short for sacrifice) is a common term in chess. Fisher was famous for his uncanny ability to see many moves ahead, and for his aggressive style as a sacrificial player. This means he would orchestrate complex sacrificial setups, whereby his opponents would take his pieces, but in the process open themselves up to (what was for them) an unforeseen, out-of-the-blue checkmate--which Fisher had seen and planned many moves ago.

    Unfortunately, sack has evolved (at least among non-professionals) to include both intentional and accidental loss of a piece. For example:

    A: How'd you lose?
    B: My queen got sacked.

    Strictly speaking, either B should have said I sacked my queen, implying he lost it on purpose, or I lost my queen, implying he lost it by accident.

    Maybe the reason sack is sometimes used improperly is due to the meaning Cagey cited, or even the meaning it has in American Football: when a quarterback is sacked, it means he was tackled, but certainly not on purpose. (The opposing team managed to surpass the offense and infiltrate the inside, in order to overtake the quarterback.)
     

    abenr

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    According to chess GM Bobby Fisher, you have to "sack, sack and sack". Please, what did he mean?
    This must have been said in jest, as Bobby was not a wild, sacrificial player. What's intended is that to win you must play aggressively, maintaining the pressure on your opponent at all times. "Sack" often "sac" is short for sacrifice. Bobby, however, did not sacrifice pieces in the way that Russian former World Champion Tal did.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top