... said that you slipped over (past simple or past perfect)

dec-sev

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.

Doctor: What happened here, then, Mike? The nurse said that you slipped over.
Mike: That's right, at the swimming pool. I'm on the water polo team.
from Click On 3 by Virginia Evans, Neil O'Sullivan.

Shouldn't it be 'the nurse said that you had slipped over'? I mean corresponence of time.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's dialogue, and so reflects the fact that people don't speak in perfect sentences.

    ADDED
    :
    The nurse said that you had slipped over.
    The nurse said that you'd slipped over.
    The nurse said that you slipped over.
    The nurse said that you (had) slipped over.
     

    Pepa´s

    Member
    Spanish
    You are right. That´s why, If the pacient is still in the surgery, I´d say: "the nurse says (or has said) you´ve slipped over. But English sometimes use the past simple although they refer something that has recently happened.
    (That´s my opinion...........)
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The past perfect often isn't used when it could be; we prefer a simpler tense. Here, he didn't slip over before something else happened - there isn't a situation containing two different past times, both of which we want to talk about. There's just a single event (his slipping over), and also the nurse said something about that. It is not relevant that first he slipped, then she spoke.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Here, he didn't slip over before something else happened - there isn't a situation containing two different past times, both of which we want to talk about. There's just a single event (his slipping over), and also the nurse said something about that. It is not relevant that first he slipped, then she spoke.
    That's what I thought. There is nothing wrong with the original.
     
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