Saint Jacques roties à la soupe de potiron, émulsion au bleu d'Auvergne

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  • viandeovine

    Member
    USA English
    (Coquilles) Saint Jacques: Roasted scallops
    potiron: pumpkin
    blue d'Auvergne: a blue cheese from Auvergne region

    Roasted scallops in a blue cheese sauce. Not sure how the pumpkin works into it...
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    I think it might be Roasted scallops in a pumpkin sauce with blue cheese.


    Merci
    I am sorry, Mount Trenchard, but I beg to differ. If it says 'soupe' in the menu, it is not a pumpkin sauce, it is definitely a small soup that is served. No later than yesterday, in the restaurant where I had dinner, there was a very tiny bowl of soup that accompanied the meat. It seems to be a new trend in cuisine.
     

    Mount Trenchard

    Senior Member
    Ireland english
    I think we posted replies at the same time. I was only guessing. I am quite sure you are correct. I have to ask about dessert next!
     

    kynnjo

    Senior Member
    USA Spanish and English
    I can't find any translation, or even definition, for "souple" used as a noun. (As an adjective it means "supple", "flexible", "lithe", etc. Nothing to do with soup or sauce.)

    Kynnjo
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    I can't find any translation, or even definition, for "souple" used as a noun. (As an adjective it means "supple", "flexible", "lithe", etc. Nothing to do with soup or sauce.)

    Kynnjo
    This is because we all assumed it was a typo. You are right indeed, 'souple' as a noun does not exist, and the adjective 'souple' in this context would not make sense.
     

    vincent7520

    Senior Member
    I feel you are all about right, however the big question is "émulsion" :
    I won't know how the latter would translate in english culinary terms but an "émulsion" is a combination of (for instance) oil and water shaken or stirred so that the oil and water makes a creamy texture. This what is done with mayonnaise : the egg yoke is used for it's watery content. Actually the real mayonnaise does not need mustard, mustard is used because it starts the process more easy but if one wants to be a purist a mayonnaise with mustard is called a "sauce ravigotte" !…
    Therefore "emulsion au bleu d'Auvergne" would be something like "a creamy blue cheese sauce".
     
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