salt cellar vs salt shaker

bibi651

New Member
arabic lebanon
Could anyone help me out to find the difference between salt cellar and salt shaker? and which one the most used in the USA??

Thank you.
 
  • bennymix

    Senior Member
    "Salt cellar" is more usually** a small bowl or dish-- See wiki article. While it may
    have a lid, you don't pick it up and shake it (to my AE way of thinking).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_cellar

    x posted with the Newt

    ================

    **ADDED: the extension of the term is broad, and may include any number of dispensers or devices, as other posters and the article state.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A salt cellar is usually some sort of bowl, often with a lid and a small spoon:




    A salt shaker is usually a sort of narrow jar with holes in the top:



    I should imagine that salt shakers are far more common.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    From that same Wikipedia article: The term salt cellar is also used generally to describe any container for table salt, thus encompassing salt shakers.
     

    bibi651

    New Member
    arabic lebanon
    A salt cellar is usually some sort of bowl, often with a lid and a small spoon:




    A salt shaker is usually a sort of narrow jar with holes in the top:



    I should imagine that salt shakers are far more common.

    PaulQ GOT IT..Thank you so much :)
     

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've never heard of a salt cellar before at all. Because a "cellar" is a storage room in a basement, it had me thinking of a room full of sealed salt containers waiting to be used to replace the one that's actually being used in the kitchen upstairs when it's empty... which sounded weird because nobody needs enough salt to dedicate a whole room to it, so no such rooms actually exist, but there was nothing else I could think of that fits the word "cellar".
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    It's certainly a peculiar term for many Americans! I have too long lived in Canada
    and been exposed to BE to be surprised, however. I suspect regions of the US, perhaps the South, may have preserved the term.

    I've never heard of a salt cellar before at all. Because a "cellar" is a storage room in a basement, it had me thinking of a room full of sealed salt containers waiting to be used to replace the one that's actually being used in the kitchen upstairs when it's empty... which sounded weird because nobody needs enough salt to dedicate a whole room to it, so no such rooms actually exist, but there was nothing else I could think of that fits the word "cellar".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Cellar meaning a storeroom (above or below ground) goes back to at least the 13th century. Salt, or salt-cellar, meaning a small vessel used on the table to hold salt goes back to at least the 15th century.

    The one-holed salt-cellar is a particularly British thing, I think. I was initially puzzled when I first travelled to Europe by the tables having what appeared to be two pepper-pots. It has the advantage that the bigger single hole clogs less easily than several smaller holes if the salt is at all damp (foggy Albion? :rolleyes: ).
     
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