Salt-tasted

percivalpc

Senior Member
I'm copyediting the Portuguese-to-English translation of a poetic text for which I have total freedom to throw out improvement suggestions. Here's a verse of the translation: "visions with a taste of salt". I'm wondering: is that the most natural, English-like way of putting it? I thought of "salt-tasted visions", but I'm not so sure.

Thanks a lot.
 
Last edited:
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    I think the problem is that the past tense of taste isn't usually used as a modifier. That makes tasted sound like a verb, at least to me. I would be able to figure out what you actually meant, but I what I would think of first is that the salt is tasting the visions.
     
    Last edited:

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Something that tastes of salt is called salty. That may not be poetic enough, but unfortunately, it's the English word that has the meaning you want.

    That said, how about "salt-flavored?" It's not something one would usually say because salt isn't considered a flavor, but in your situation it might work.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I'm copyediting the Portuguese-to-English translation of a poetic text for which I have total freedom to throw out improvement suggestions. Here's a verse of the translation: "visions with a taste of salt". I'm wondering: is that the most natural, English-like way of putting it? I thought of "salt-tasted visions", but I'm not so sure.

    Thanks a lot.
    This is poetry: you are allowed poetic licence: I would say, "salted visions". However, we know nothing of the context. In Portuguese culture are "visions with a taste of salt" better or worse than ordinary visions? Is there reference to the sea? Does "with the taste of salt" mean stronger (better) tasting or unpalatable?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It's a bit unfair to expect us to come up with suggestions out of context. What are these salty visions? Is there a connection, for example, with seafaring tales? You'll be aware that an old sailor is often referred to as an "old salt".
     

    akhooha

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It all really depends on the original Portuguese, doesn't it? If the original were something close to "visões com um gosto de sal", then "visions with a taste of salt" would be the best. If you describe something as "salty", it usually means that the salt is the dominant taste; if something has a "taste of salt", it means that, while not dominant, there is a saltiness that can be perceived; if something is "salted", it can mean that it is preserved with salt, like "salted herring".....
    You'd really be better off asking your question in the Portuguese forum --- at least the folks there would have an idea about the meaning of the original Portuguese. Asking here will bring you nothing but wild guesses which may or may not have anything to do with the original Portuguese....
     
    Last edited:

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Salty can also mean a rather naughty humor, too. Are these earthy, somewhat sensual visions?
     
    Top