salto temporale

Elisabeth_

New Member
Italian
Ciao a tutti!

Come si può tradurre in inglese "fare un salto temporale"?

Es: Facendo un salto temporale di sei secoli si giunge al XIII secolo …

Cercando online ho trovato to time jump e to take a time jump, ma non credo si possano utilizzare in questo contesto.

Il testo da cui è tratta la frase racconta come Oriente e Occidente sono entrati in contatto nel corso dei secoli.

Grazie.
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I'd say Taking a leap in time...
    Ciao Ben, "to take the leap" generally means to finally commit yourself to something such as becoming a student, a vegetarian, etc.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Come si può tradurre in inglese "fare un salto temporale"?
    Es: Facendo un salto temporale di sei secoli si giunge al XIII secolo …
    I think the most natural way to say it would be "Going / stepping back in time [by] six centuries...." or "Going / stepping six centuries back in time....". If the context doesn't really require the concept of a sudden salto, this could work.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I think the most natural way to say it would be "Going / stepping back in time [by] six centuries...." or "Going / stepping six centuries back in time....". If the context doesn't really require the concept of a sudden salto, this could work.
    I agree this sounds more natural if you can avoid the leap metaphor.
     

    Elisabeth_

    New Member
    Italian
    I think the most natural way to say it would be "Going / stepping back in time [by] six centuries...." or "Going / stepping six centuries back in time....". If the context doesn't really require the concept of a sudden salto, this could work.
    Thank you for the suggestion :)

    I agree this sounds more natural if you can avoid the leap metaphor.
    Thank you :)

    Forse potrebbe funzionare "to take the leap".

    Bye,
    Benzene
    Thanks!
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Potrebbe anche funzionare "fast forward 600 years...".
    Except that if we're going back to the 13th century, we'd be fast backwarding instead, which unfortunately is not, as they say, a thing. :D

    Then again, re-reading the OP, it's not completely clear if the salto is backwards or forwards. Perhaps the line before Facendo un salto temporale had to do with the 7th century? Then my only doubt about Fast forward 600 years would be whether it's too informal for the context.
     

    Elisabeth_

    New Member
    Italian
    Except that if we're going back to the 13th century, we'd be fast backwarding instead, which unfortunately is not, as they say, a thing. :D

    Then again, re-reading the OP, it's not completely clear if the salto is backwards or forwards. Perhaps the line before Facendo un salto temporale had to do with the 7th century? Then my only doubt about Fast forward 600 years would be whether it's too informal for the context.
    Actually the line before the "salto" refers to the 7th century! So it would be "fast forward 600 years".

    E io che pensavo che si trattasse di fantascienza quando ho letto il titolo.:D

    I agree with the others.:)
    Purtroppo no xD
    Grazie!

    Potrebbe anche funzionare "fast forward 600 years...".
    Grazie :)
     

    furs

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Just out of curiosity, does un salto temporale imply in itself a salto forwards rather than backwards?
    No, it could well be used in both directions, forwards or backwards. In this case, it was kind of evident from the context ("Il testo da cui è tratta la frase racconta come Oriente e Occidente sono entrati in contatto nel corso dei secoli") that the leap was from the 7th to the 13th century, as historical essays usually move forward, don't they?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    No, it could well be used in both directions, forwards or backwards. In this case, it was kind of evident from the context ("Il testo da cui è tratta la frase racconta come Oriente e Occidente sono entrati in contatto nel corso dei secoli") that the leap was from the 7th to the 13th century, as historical essays usually move forward, don't they?
    Okay, thanks for clarifying. :) I suppose historical essays usually move forward, but it's entirely possible to use a "flashback" moment, as in "here are the underlying causes of event x in the 19th century," so without more context, a backwards leap can't be ruled out. I don't know why I automatically assumed it, though.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top