salty

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cigogne

Senior Member
Persian
Hi,

I found out from the forum that salty food does not mean excessively salty, but it means there is an acceptable amount of saltiness. Is there any special word for the food with excessive amount of salt. Is there any word for the food with no salt?

Thank you!
 
  • cigogne

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Hi,

    I read in my English speaking book "people often add ... for me to explain why they do not like a particular dish. for example, It's a bit salty for me." I understand that salty here means excessively salty. Am I right?

    Thank you
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a bit salty for me = it is somewhat too salty for me. Yes, you understand correctly.

    You cannot assume that "salty" means the correct amount of saltiness, it depends on context. For example People with high blood pressure should not eat salty food.
     

    cigogne

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thank you. Can I say for example the chicken is tasty for me? or "for me" is just added when I don't like the dish?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you mean "salty for me"? The thread's not about tasty. You need a modifier - too salty for me, a bit salty for me, not salty enough for me
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    It's a bit salty is an absolute expression---it's too salty for everybody.

    But in fact different people like different amounts of salty taste in their food.

    You acknowledge that fact by saying it's a bit salty for me [but maybe not for you].
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I found out from the forum that salty food does not mean excessively salty, but it means there is an acceptable amount of saltiness.
    I have to disagree with this statement. If the amount of salt is acceptable, it doesn't attract attention, and there's no reason to talk about it.
    For me, if someone says "The soup is salty," it means they would prefer it with less salt.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a bit salty is an absolute expression---it's too salty for everybody.
    I disagree. Saltiness (of food) is always a matter of individual taste. If somebody says This soup is a bit salty they are expressing a personal taste. The next person may well say No it's not.
     

    cigogne

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I have to disagree with this statement. If the amount of salt is acceptable, it doesn't attract attention, and there's no reason to talk about it.
    For me, if someone says "The soup is salty," it means they would prefer it with less salt.
    Would you please tell me what the difference between these two sentences is?
    "The chicken is a bit salty."
    "The chicken is a bit too salty."
    Thank you!
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Would you please tell me what the difference between these two sentences is?
    [1] "The chicken is a bit salty."
    [2] "The chicken is a bit too salty."
    Both [1] and [2] mean I've put too much salt on the chicken (for the speaker's taste); the speaker would have liked it better with less salt.
    In [1] the speaker is being more considerate of my feelings as the chef; in [2], less so.
     

    cigogne

    Senior Member
    Persian
    If this is a conversation among people eating in a restraunt (no chef), then what is the difference between the two sentences?

    Thank you!
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    "The chicken is a bit salty." = I would prefer it with less salt but I shall eat it all the same.
    "The chicken is a bit too salty." = It's virtually inedible.
    "The chicken is too salty." = It's truly inedible.
     
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