salutare

swansea12

Banned
english british
It seems that the Italians use salutare as a word to greet as well as say goodbye.In other languages like German it is more specific perhaps."Auf wiedersehen" is pretty emphatically indicating goodbye rather than hello.So too in English.".. e vorrei salutarti e manda un saluto anche tu ai nostri lettori".Is this about the word salutare being about the fundamental act of greeting,it being non-specific?How do Italians use this word in sense of both saying hello and goodbye?
 
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  • delenda1

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It seems that the Italians use salutare as a word to greet as well as say goodbye.In other languages like German it is more specific perhaps."Auf wiedersehen" is pretty emphatically indicating goodbye rather than hello.So too in English.".. e vorrei salutarti e manda un saluto anche tu ai nostri lettori".Is this about the word salutare being about the fundamental act of greeting,it being non-specific?How do Italians use this word in sense of both saying hello and goodbye?
    in the context of your sentence it really could go either way, the writer is likely saying "hello", but he/she might also be saying "goodbye".

    In Italian "salutare' literally means "wishing good health", or more appropriately "greet", so you may -as a matter of fact- "salutare" whether you're coming or going. I'd say it's roughly like the English "Good day/evening!", you can say it in either situation.
    Which is why Italians say "Ciao" both, when they arrive and when they leave.
     
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