Salutation and Salutatory Address

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ali likes the stars

Senior Member
German, Persian
Hello,

in our software users can pick options from a list of placeholders to insert into emails or letters:
  1. The placeholder "Salutation" will output "Mr." or "Ms." or "Mx."
  2. The placeholder "Salutatory Address" will output "Dear Mr. {Jon} {Doe}" or "Dear Ms. {Jane} {Doe}" or "Hello {Jean} {Doe}"

Note: I read somewhere that salutatory address as a noun is very rarely used.

Question: What other names could I give these placeholders that will be most easily and naturally understood by English speakers?
 
  • ali likes the stars

    Senior Member
    German, Persian
    Hello tunaafi, thank you for your response. "Title" is already another placeholder for actual titles such as "Dr." or "Prof":

    [Title] [First Name] [Last Name] --> {Dr.} [Jon} {Doe}
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    Do you need two files, one for academic and one for non-academic titles? We never mix the two in English; we use either one or the other, so I would think you need only one file.
     

    ali likes the stars

    Senior Member
    German, Persian
    I am aware. The single placeholders can be manually combined, e.g. {Title} and {Last Name} or {Salutation} and {Last Name}.

    As for the {Salutatory Address}, it will be a dynamic placeholder with an if-then-condition, so that if the person has a title, the result will be {Dear Dr. Doe}, and if they don't have a title, the result will be {Dear Mr. Doe}.

    Still the question is, whether users will naturally understand the difference between {Salutation} for a honorific prefix and {Salutatory Address} for complete opening line?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think in Germany you do get two together - Professor Dr Schmidt, for instance.

    Why not go for Title1 and Title2? We customarily say 'salutation' to refer to the 'Dear Mr Smith' bit. See for example Salutation - Wikipedia
     

    ali likes the stars

    Senior Member
    German, Persian
    Because in a list of placeholders {Title1} and {Title2} will not be very recognizable, will it? User-friendliness is a major concern. The question is to find a placeholder name that is instantly understood.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The problem is that in English, Dr, Mr, Revd, Lord are all titles. If you give it a different name, it won't be recognisable immediately. If you don't plan on using multiple titles, I'd go with tunaafi's suggestion of lumping everything together. Otherwise you'd need to put in a label that can distinguish the two, eg 'acad title' and 'non-acad title'.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Although you can address (verb) a person as 'Dr Doe' or 'Dear Dr Doe', the noun 'address' in a database would be Flat 2, 33 Railway Cuttings, East Cheam, or wherever they live. The word 'salutatory' is virtually never used, so 'salutatory address' would be doubly incomprehensible.

    As others have said, the English usage is pretty clear: 'title' includes 'Mr' and 'Dr' and all such, and the salutation is the combination 'Dear' and title and name. Any programmer wanting their terms to be clear would have to stick to these.
     

    ali likes the stars

    Senior Member
    German, Persian
    Thank you everybody, this was most helpful.

    As others have said, the English usage is pretty clear: 'title' includes 'Mr' and 'Dr' and all such, and the salutation is the combination 'Dear' and title and name. Any programmer wanting their terms to be clear would have to stick to these.
    I will take this into consideration then.
     
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