salute flag-raising

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

Last year when I visited Beijing, a native friend asked me to get up at 5 and he would drive me to Tianan Men Square to see soldiers raise flag, and he said in Chinese:

Shall we salute flag raising tomorrow morning?

I guess my translation is not natural, I wonder if there's a better or idiomatic way to express the same thought? I think "see flag raising" is not very good as "salute flag raising", it's a solemn moment, so I use "salute", as for "flag raising", I made it up because of the term "raise flag".

Thanks a lot
 
  • Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    'Salute' means to make a gesture with your hand to indicate respect (or if you're a soldier, with your weapon), usually raising your hand to your head with your palm open. Do you do this during the flag raising ceremony, or do you just watch?
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    I see. In that case you should just say 'shall we attend the flag raising ceremony'. 'Attend' is a perfectly suitable word for a solemn occasion, we say for example 'I attended the funeral', or 'I attended the remembrance service'.

    I have just watched a video of the flag raising ceremony in Tiananmen Square by the way and it is indeed a short but dignified ritual, I'll be sure to catch it if I am ever in Beijing. Although I can't say I'd attend such a thing if they existed in the UK, but that's a different matter :0. Anyway, thank you for providing me with an interesting cultural insight, it's one of the main reasons I come to this forum.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    'Salute' means to make a gesture with your hand to indicate respect (or if you're a soldier, with your weapon), usually raising your hand to your head with your palm open. Do you do this during the flag raising ceremony, or do you just watch?
    "Salutes," in the way they are expressed, vary between countries, even to the point of whether they are done at all.

    In the U.S. Marine Corps, in which I served and unlike the Army and Air Force, one salutes only when "covered," i.e. wearing something (hat, helmet, etc.) on one's head.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    That's a fair point Graham, I was just describing the basic anglophone way of saluting from a civilian perspective, there are many others I'm sure. Although I think you'd agree that the word 'salute' in a non-military context must denote some kind of physical gesture.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    That's a fair point Graham, I was just describing the basic anglophone way of saluting from a civilian perspective, there are many others I'm sure. Although I think you'd agree that the word 'salute' in a non-military context must denote some kind of physical gesture.
    Yes, indeed. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top