same,different

  • Ed the Editor

    Senior Member
    nasridine said:
    I'm in the same office as him.
    I'm in the different office to him.

    Am I right with these two sentences?
    Nasridine,

    The first sentence is okay in oral speech, although it's technically not grammatical. For written speech, I'd say "I'm in the same office that he is."

    The second sentence isn't grammatical. For both written and oral speech, I'd say "I'm in a different office than he is."
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    nasridine said:
    I'm in the same office as him. :tick:
    I'm in the different office to him. :cross:

    Am I right with these two sentences?

    I'm in a different office to him.

    or, if there are only two offices …
    I'm in the other office to him.
     

    eac

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you want to be absolutely correct, different always takes the preposition from, because that is the preposition that the verb differ takes. I suggest:

    I am in the same office that he is.
    I am in a different office from his.
     

    BSmith

    Member
    U.S.A. - English
    eac said:
    If you want to be absolutely correct, different always takes the preposition from, because that is the preposition that the verb differ takes. I suggest:

    I am in the same office that he is.
    I am in a different office from his.

    I agree.

    Saying "I'm in a different office TO him" sounds completely wrong in American English.

    Of course, that's only my take. Obviously, it's correct either way, as two "over the pond" English speakers pointed out.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I agree about the "from/to" difference. This, too, sounds odd in American English:
    maxiogee said:
    I'm in the other office to him.
     

    dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    From the New Oxford American Dictionary:

    "In general, different from is the construction most often used in the U.S. and Britain, although different than (used almost exclusively in North America) is also used, esp. in speech. Different from can sometimes lead to wordy constructions, whereas different than implies a comparison that from usually does not. . . Different to is common in Britain, but sounds strange to American ears. Than is more often acceptable when following the adverb differently, but still implies a comparison."
     
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