Same form for a formal and an informal "you"

MarX

Banned
Indonesian, Indonesia
Hello!

Are there any other languages beside English that have only a single word for "you"?

The closest example I've found so far is Swedish, where as far as I know "du" is used universally.

Thank you!


MarX
 
  • MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Ähmm, I don't know who changed the title, but what I meant was a language where no various forms of pronouns exist for "you", they may differ according to number (singular or plural), but without such opposition such as German du & Sie, Spanish tú & usted, Dutch jij & U, etc.

    In English you say "you" to everybody. And it happens that you also do it to more than one person.

    I hope you get my message conveyed.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    If I understand you well, you wish to know which languages lack a distinction between a formal and an informal "you".

    Irish is another language where this happens.
     

    cute angel

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Hello ;

    For Arabic it's انت /انتم Anta for singular and Antom for plural also in French we have tu for sungular and vous for plural.
     

    Lemminkäinen

    Senior Member
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    Norwegian has, strictly speaking, formal "you" pronouns, but they are outdated (fell out of use two-three decades ago). In other words, we use the same (informal) pronoun to each other: du.

    However, the plural "you" is different, of course: dere.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Arabic, like English, has no formality distinction, even though there are five different forms of "you" (masculine singular, feminine singular, dual, masculine plural, and feminine plural). As Arabic and English are the two languages I grew up with, using different forms of "you" depending on formality is still not entirely intuitive to me, even though I've learned several languages that have such a distinction.
     

    Kannan91

    Member
    Malayalam
    Hello ;

    For Arabic it's انت /انتم Anta for singular and Antom for plural also in French we have tu for sungular and vous for plural.
    But French also makes a distinction for formality there - vous is used as a formal/respectful singular pronoun as well, so it does not fit the criterion for this thread.
     

    MingRaymond

    Senior Member
    HK Cantonese
    Mandarin:
    你(ni3) and 您(nin2)

    Cantonese:
    你(nei3)
    In Cantonese, we only use 你 in spoken language. Depends on the context, sometimes it can be a polite form. Also, due to the influence of Mandarin, 您 also exist, sometimes people write 您 when they write Cantonese(normally only informally on IM and blogs). The interesting thing is that 你 and 您 have the same pronunciation in Cantonese, so when spoken, they are the same. The conclusion is that Cantonese has only one 'you' when spoken.

    MR
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    In English you say "you" to everybody. And it happens that you also do it to more than one person.

    But even though there's only 'you' in English you can nevertheless be on 'first name' terms or not, with anyone.

    In my experience, though, with business contacts on the 'same level' (hierarchically) usually (at least with the British) you are at first-name-terms right from the beginning.

    As for Norvegian and Swedish: is there still a first-name-terms difference even though nowadays only informal 'you' is used?

    In Austria there were (and to a degree, in certain regions, still are) three different forms of formality: the informal 'you' = 'du' (2nd singular), the formal 'you' = 'sie' (3rd plural), and then something 'in between' = 'ihr' (2nd plural), the latter still used especially in rural regions but sometimes even in cities.

    And last but not least there seems to be a very young trend here in Vienna especially (and sometimes used by the media when interviewing VIP's): the use of formal 'sie' but first-name-terms!
    Most noticeably for example in a very popular show where it would always be: 'Andrea, Sie haben ...' = 'Andrea (first name), you (formal 'you') have ...' This seems to be modeled on English.

    So in Austria nowadays there coexist four levels of formality.
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Thank you, guys!

    So, so far, the languages where one form is used for "you" are:

    English
    Irish
    Arabic
    Cantonese
    Swedish*
    Norwegian*

    In Spain, "usted" is also rarely used.
    When I was there, I noticed that everybody tú'ed each other, even the professor and students at the uni.


    *Theoretically there are formal forms in these languages, but they (almost) got out of use.


    Further input is welcome! :)


    Grüsse,


    MarK
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    *Theoretically there are formal forms in these languages, but they (almost) got out of use.
    As I said in post #7, English is one of those "*Theoretically" languages.

    And in Finland's Swedish the formal form is at least commonly accepted if not so commonly used anymore.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    In Spain, "usted" is also rarely used.
    When I was there, I noticed that everybody tú'ed each other, even the professor and students at the uni.

    I don't think it would be correct to list Spanish here.

    Although in Spain tutear seems to be much more common than in Latin America, it is not at all common to tutear all the time.
     

    Orreaga

    Senior Member
    USA; English
    In Basque there is one form that is 2nd person neutral/polite, "zu" (sing.), "zuek" (pl.), although there is a different "very familiar/intimate" form only in the singular, "hi", which does not take 2nd person verb forms, but a modified 1st person form. At least that's what my textbook says... I'd appreciate confirmation from a native speaker.

    In Navajo there is only one form, "ni" (sing.), "nihí" (pl.).
     

    Mjolnir

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew, English
    Hebrew has no formality distinction, and there are four different forms of "you" - masculine singular, feminine singular, masculine plural, and feminine plural.
     

    Joannes

    Senior Member
    Belgian Dutch
    The story about Dutch:

    The Old Dutch 2SG personal pronoun was thu (like English thou) which became du in Middle Dutch. As in many languages, the 2PL pronoun ghi got to be used as a formal address for the singular. Du got lost which made ghi the pronoun for the second person without marking singular/plural or formal/informal. (An atonic form of du was retained as an enclitic to verbs though, as in hebde 'have you' or slaapte 'sleep you'.) Later, the singular-plural distinction was made clear again by constructions like gij allen 'you all' and gij lieden 'you guys', the last of which resulted in jullie, which is the current 2PL form. (Compare the forms y'all and youguys as they are used in the States, and vosotros in Spanish, where at the time of vosotros's evolvement, vos was used in the same way as ghi / English you.) Gij got replaced by jij, and later the form u evolved as a formal second person pronoun, out of uwe edelheid 'your nobility', in which uwe is the possessive form of gij (compare Spanish again where usted came from vuestra merced.)

    There are however still some dialects that use du, like in Limburg. And in most of Belgium, gij is still the usual form for the second person singular, jij actually being considered quite formal and distant, as it is Standard Dutch.
     

    modus.irrealis

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Compare the forms y'all and youguys as they are used in the States
    That's a good point and in fact, now that I think of it, I do have an informal vs. formal distinction in my spoken English but only in the plural forms where you guys is definitely informal -- I couldn't imagine for example giving a presentation and addressing the audience as anything other than you, but if it's a group of friends, it will automatically be you guys.
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Thank you very much for your info upon Dutch, Ioannes!! I never knew the history of Dutch you's.

    Apparently it's usual that the second person plural pronoun became used as singular.
    You is an example. Then there is vos, and gij, and in Indonesian the word kamu was originally plural. I never knew this until I looked closer in the Bible, where kamu is always used in a plural context, whereas (eng)kau is the singular form.

    Indonesian is far from having only one form of "you". In the singular there are at least three ways of saying "you".
     

    Orreaga

    Senior Member
    USA; English
    there's even a thread here in this forum about why Argentinos se tutean en los foros - and if you read in the Spanish sections of this forum you will quickly learn that vos(ostros) (the LA form of usted and formal form of 'you') is widely used here.

    Unless I've misundertood you, you seem to be saying vos is the formal form of you in Argentina, which is not the case. Vos in Argentina (and certain other places in Latin America) is the familiar form, used instead of , and the discussion about why Argentines se tutean en los foros is about why they use the form instead of vos in the forum. In places where voseo is the norm, usted is still used for formal speech (and ustedes for both formal and familiar plural, not vosotros).

    In any case, Wikipedia has an article called T-V distinction which could be of use. It appears that this has been a widespread distinction in European languages for several centuries, stemming from issues of royalty, nobility and class distinctions, but not much is said about other language groups, even though the article makes use of annoying generalizations like "most languages...". I don't believe they're including African languages or indigenous languages of the Americas when they talk about "most languages".
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    It appears that this has been a widespread distinction in European languages for several centuries, stemming from issues of royalty, nobility and class distinctions, but not much is said about other language groups [...] I don't believe they're including African languages or indigenous languages of the Americas when they talk about "most languages".
    They mention also:

    Amharic
    Bengali
    Chinese
    Filipino
    Indonesian
    Japanese
    Kannada
    Kazakh
    !Kung-ekoka (an African language)
    Kurdish
    Kyrgyz
    Malay
    Nepali
    Oriya
    Somali (another African language)
    Tagalog
    Tajik
    Tamil
    Telugu
    Turkish
    Ubykh
    Urdu
    Uyghur

    T-V distinction article.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Unless I've misundertood you, you seem to be saying vos is the formal form of you in Argentina, which is not the case. Vos in Argentina (and certain other places in Latin America) is the familiar form (...)
    I'm sorry - I only browsed the thread about Argentines' usage of 'vos': and no, I didn't know that this is an informal form. Thank you for clarification and for correcting my mistake. I'll correct my post at once!
     

    Orreaga

    Senior Member
    USA; English
    They mention also:

    Amharic Bengali Chinese Filipino Indonesian Japanese Kannada Kazakh !Kung-ekoka (an African language) Kurdish Kyrgyz Malay Nepali Oriya Somali (another African language) Tagalog Tajik Tamil Telugu Turkish Ubykh Urdu Uyghur

    T-V distinction article.
    In the list given, yes, there are several non-European languages mentioned (2 African languages out of 2000, no Native American languages), but in the article above the list there is the problematic phrase: "most languages use formal speech more frequently, and/or in different circumstances than English." I think you have to be careful when saying anything about "most languages" unless you've done a survey of the 600+ indigenous languages of the Americas, approximately 2000 languages of Africa, not to mention the 800 or so languages of Papua New Guinea alone and languages spoken in other parts of the globe. ;)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I think that they're referring to the languages that have a T-V distinction. But you have a point that it can be misread. :cool:
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    русский (Russian)
    Mandarin:
    你(ni3) and 您(nin2)

    Cantonese:
    你(nei3)
    In Cantonese, we only use 你 in spoken language. Depends on the context, sometimes it can be a polite form. Also, due to the influence of Mandarin, 您 also exist, sometimes people write 您 when they write Cantonese(normally only informally on IM and blogs). The interesting thing is that 你 and 您 have the same pronunciation in Cantonese, so when spoken, they are the same. The conclusion is that Cantonese has only one 'you' when spoken.

    MR
    It's worth mentioning that even in formal Chinese Mandarin the polite form 您 [nín] is not so often used, 你 [nǐ] is used much more often, without being rude, also 您 doesn't have a plural form.

    Russian, like French, German, etc has ты/вы (ty/vy) (IPA:[tɨ], [vɨ]), which are very common, the latter one is also the plural form of "you". Other Slavic languages have a similar feature.

    Polish, unlike other Slavic languages has "ty" and words Pan (m), Pani (f), Panna (seldom for "Miss"), Państwo (plural) - these words may differ in the vocative case. The words derive from nouns and are used in 3rd person. "wy" is a plural form and is seldom used as the Russian "вы" in modern Polish.

    Japanese usage of personal pronouns is restricted, names are preferred instead but there are a number of pronouns, which may be used. The most neutral, common and polite enough is 貴方 / あなた [anata], which can be used to address a single person you don't know. Besides, pronouns are too often omitted, if the context is known. Most Japanese pronouns are derived from some nouns and may have other meanings and usages. I would add Japanese to French/German group or make a separate one.
     

    fer7

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hello! I can't see Spanish so sorry if it's repeated.
    In Spain, we use "tú" (informal) and "usted" (formal).

    I saw something about the word "tutear": it's the way of calling each other "tú".

    Hope it helped and sorry for my English mistakes. I'm only a learner!
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Surprisingly Brazilian Portuguese (at least some variants) has not been mentioned yet if I am not wrong. This is one of the ever-lasting topics of the Portuguese forum.
    That's because in Brazilian Portuguese there are separate words for formal and informal "you":

    informal sg.: você
    formal sg.: o senhor / a senhora
     

    Miguel Antonio

    Senior Member
    Galego (Rías Baixas)
    That's because in Brazilian Portuguese there are separate words for formal and informal "you":

    informal sg.: você
    formal sg.: o senhor / a senhora
    What I am going to say is the exact opposite of the question asked. I have yet to grasp the true nuances underlying the multi-tiered forms of addressing someone in Portugal:
    Tu very, very informal (not even between parents and their children and viceversa, as in some cases I have often witnessed)
    Você loosely informal
    O António, a Maria ???
    O senhor/a senhora vaguely formal
    O senhor António, a dona Maria a little more formal, perhaps?
    O senhor engenheiro/ a senhora doutora to underpin social class distinction, I wonder?

    Help me, Outsider!
    O
     

    Topsie

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    But even though there's only 'you' in English you can nevertheless be on 'first name' terms or not, with anyone.
    ....
    Most noticeably for example in a very popular show where it would always be: 'Andrea, Sie haben ...' = 'Andrea (first name), you (formal 'you') have ...' This seems to be modeled on English.

    So in Austria nowadays there coexist four levels of formality.

    In French too, you can call people by their first names and still say "vous" - it is less formal than giving them "Madame" or "Monsieur", but more formal than saying "tu". (I've often come across it in business environments)
     

    flong3

    New Member
    English - USA
    English had a formal and an informal 'you.' You was the formal form and Thou was the informal form. Thou and associate words died out in the transition from Early Modern English to Modern English.
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Japanese usage of personal pronouns is restricted, names are preferred instead but there are a number of pronouns, which may be used. The most neutral, common and polite enough is 貴方 / あなた [anata], which can be used to address a single person you don't know. Besides, pronouns are too often omitted, if the context is known. Most Japanese pronouns are derived from some nouns and may have other meanings and usages.
    That's very similar to the case in Indonesian. We have many ways to say "you", and many are derived from nouns, yet we often omit the pronoun if it's obvious from the context.
     

    helixgrad

    New Member
    Brazilian portuguese
    In Brazilian portuguese, we say usually "Você" (informal) and "o senhor/a senhora" (formal). There is also in some areas of Brazil "tu", but this is also informal, and is only another word for "você". It is good to note that in Brazil we conjugate the verb as if "tu", "o senhor/a senhora" and "você" were third person. There is a second person conjugation, but nobody uses it anymore. I think that is not the case in Portugal, where the second person conjugation is used.

    One more for the list: in Latin, there is only one form: "tu". It doesn't matter if you are talking to a child or to a god.
     

    dinji

    Senior Member
    Swedish - Finland
    It is difficult but not impossible to distinguish two separate questions:
    1) Does a language have multiple forms for the personal pronoun in 2nd person singular (some times using formally 3rd person or plural forms), based on social distance or subjugation. This is the question of the thread.
    2) Does the language provide for marking socially distance or subjugation?

    In the case of Hebrew the language provides the possibilty to adress somebody socially respected as "adoni hanikhbad" (my respected mister) or "gvirti hanikhbedet" (my respected lady) but it does not make use of pronouns here.

    In the case of Swedish and Finnish, the original system for showing respect and sometimes social distance was a third person singular with a noun based subject. "Magistern är så god och..."/ "Maisteri on niin hyvä ja....." or "Fröken är så snäll och..."/ "Neiti on nin hyvä ja..." or even to your own parents: "Kan pappa räcka mej brödet...".
    This system is practically dead. Instead the remnants of a system marking distance originally based on superiority and sometime disrespect (2nd person plural Sw. "Ni" Fi. "Te") is still in existence and was for some time used to substitute for the death of the previous system. Thus most people in Finland today would think it is polite to use the 2nd person plural (Ni/Te) to a stranger, but for old people this sounds very rude: originally the 2nd person plural was only used from a superior social position and to show respect the third person singular was used with a noun describing the addressed person as a subject.

    This effectively corresponds to the Portuguese polite form: "O senhor...".
     
    Last edited:

    Black4blue

    Senior Member
    Turkish/Türkçe
    In Turkish, we use plural forms to make pronouns formal. There was formal forms of third singular person formerly, but it's very very rare now. So, we use plural form of you (siz) to make the singular you (sen) formal.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Hello!

    Are there any other languages beside English that have only a single word for "you"?

    The closest example I've found so far is Swedish, where as far as I know "du" is used universally.

    Thank you!


    MarX


    Costa Rican Spanish:
    Usted (both formal and informal) you
    Ustedes
    (both formal and informal) you (pl)
    ---
    Some dialects use vos along with usted.

    Most (I'd say 75%) Brazilian dialects:
    você (both formal and informal) you
    vocês (both formal and informal) you (pl.)
    ---
    Você is replacing the forms of respect like o senhor, or o cavalheiro...
    It's not unusual to use você instead of these forms, even in a
    formal setting. People don't like being adressed to with o senhor
    because they think o senhor should be used with (very) old people only
    and will answer you: O senhor está no Céu! (The Almighty is in Heaven).
    So, in Brazilian Portuguese, o senhor is becoming more or less like sir in English...
     
    Last edited:
    Greek has a peculiarity. While in its Classical/Koine period, it formed different forms of informal and formal "you"-->
    You (informal): «Σὺ» (su; Doric, tu) from PIE base *tu, thou.
    You (plural/formal): «Ὑμεῖς» (hu'meis; Aeolic «ὕμμε», hummĕ) from PIE base *(y)us-(s)me, you.
    In its Byzantine/Modern period uses the same "you"-->
    You (informal): «Συ» or «εσύ» (si, or e'si)
    You (plural/formal): «Σεις» or «εσείς» (sis, or e'sis); formed quite logically, it's the plural of «συ»
     

    Serafín33

    Senior Member
    Costa Rican Spanish:
    Usted (both formal and informal) you
    Yep, also found in many speakers in Guatemala and Colombia.

    (Which strikes me as very odd, how come ustedeo would be found in these three unconnected countries? I understand why it isn't found in (at least Urban) Panama due to the large influence of Caribbean Spanish there, but why haven't I ever heard it in El Salvador or Honduras?)
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    In Colombia (except for the Atlantic Coast where the ''classical'' usage is observed: = informal, Vd. = formal; vos = not used) people seem to use all three tú, vos, Vd informally, but is unheard of in some places like Santiago de Cali where only vos and Vd are used as informal pronouns. I believe that in Medellín and Bogotá they use all three pronouns informally: vos, tú and Vd with no difference. ;)
     

    thisyearsgirl

    New Member
    English - United States
    Very true. Just because a language may have different formalities of "you" doesn't mean regional usage always follows the prescribed rules.
    In Medellín, at least, ustedeo is very common. While I was there, my friend's family usually all referred to each other this way. Even their puppy was usted. At first it was baffling to hear things like, "¡Venga!" or "¡No me muerda o le pegue!" (Don't bite me or I'll spank you!") when talking to a dog. It almost sounded to me like there was an implied "sir" or "mister" in there. As in, "I'll spank you, sir"!
    As a speaker of modern English, I find the concept of different levels of formality of "you" stressful to deal with. When speaking Spanish, I find myself trying hard to find a balance between sounding educated and polite (unless with close friends), local usage, and my own level of comfort/understanding. Also in the US, schools tend to teach a neutral/Mexican Spanish which has more "classical" tú/usted usage. El voseo is practically never even mentioned. So while I understand the difference I think if I were in Spain, I'd be uncomfortable tuteando everyone, but in Bogotá, I'd feel awkward always using usted.
    Istriano is correct. In Medellín, vos, tú, and usted all are used seemingly at random. At times I've been referred to by all three in the same conversation! When I asked my Paisa friend why, he attributed it to the fact that some usted forms just "sound better" to him. So, except in stricly formal situations, it's completely subjective. Use whichever you'd like! However in Botogá, I don't believe vos is common. They use the tú/usted system except that usted is used faaaar more often. It's also worth noting that in Botogá, you will most likely never hear two males refer to each other as , because it sounds "too initimate". That's also true of Medellín, but there two good male friends could also use vos in addition to usted. I don't have any first hand knowledge how it works in the coastal or southern regions though.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Well, in Polish the story is even more complicated because you have to use Pan/Pani Sir/Madam in even not very formal situation, if you do not know the person and he or she is an adult. In Lithuanian there is also ponas and ponia but it is used differently only in certain contexts, otherwise the second person formal form is used. Is Madame and Monsieur still used in French?
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    ...Is Madame and Monsieur still used in French?
    Hello,
    Madame & Monsieur are both still widely used in French. (However I'm not entirely sure I've understood you question correctly.)
    Also English has two words: thou and you, although the singular/informal word thou is not used anymore except when talking to God.
    Several people have mentioned that thou is no longer used. While it's true that the formal "you" is almost uniquely used now-a-days ; several regional dialects in England & Scotland still use the informal thou (though it's form is altered in some of those dialects) in everyday speech. So the original post was some what flawed, to begin with.
    If I understand you well, you wish to know which languages lack a distinction between a formal and an informal "you".

    Irish is another language where this happens.
    It's not so much that Irish lacks a distinction between formal and informal, rather that this distinction is little used today. In modern day Irish we have retained the informal "Conas atá tú?" (How are you?) rather than the polite Classical Irish "Conas atá sibh?" So "sibh" is now used only as a plural in Irish. However Scottish Gaelic (a dialect) has retained the formal usage in some areas of Scotland.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Hi. Thank you. Do you have to refer to people in French as Madam and Monsieur each time you say something to them, if you do not know them well. This is the case in Polish, although some people do not agree with me and apparently the rules are less strict now which is a pity. Do you have to repeat the Madam and Monsieur almost in every sentence or only when you address them.
     

    terredepomme

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Mandarin: 你 and 您
    Although technically one would have the include the female form(妳) which differs only in writing.
    More technically the "divine" form (祢) which is quite creative I would say.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Finnish
    Swedish has both "du" (informal), and "Ni" (formal). No language I know, besides English, has only one word.
    For many Swedes, especially those of the baby boom generation and older that made the change from Ni to du, the formal "Ni" in second person singular is not seen as a polite address but rather as a dismissive form of address.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    The story about Dutch:

    The Old Dutch 2SG personal pronoun was thu (like English thou) which became du in Middle Dutch. As in many languages, the 2PL pronoun ghi got to be used as a formal address for the singular. Du got lost which made ghi the pronoun for the second person without marking singular/plural or formal/informal. (An atonic form of du was retained as an enclitic to verbs though, as in hebde 'have you' or slaapte 'sleep you'.) Later, the singular-plural distinction was made clear again by constructions like gij allen 'you all' and gij lieden 'you guys', the last of which resulted in jullie, which is the current 2PL form. Gij got replaced by jij, and later the form u evolved as a formal second person pronoun, out of uwe edelheid 'your nobility', in which uwe is the possessive form of gij.

    There are however still some dialects that use du, like in Limburg. And in most of Belgium, gij is still the usual form for the second person singular, jij actually being considered quite formal and distant, as it is Standard Dutch.
    Very interesting information, Joannes, giving an good summary of the origin of most pronouns. I'd add that in my dialect we use an u form as a possessive pronoun and as an object form as well. I'd also like to point out that dialects probably do not have polite pronouns; I think politeness is marked lexically (I could not do it otherwise). Maybe in one particular form of Dutch (verkavelingsvlaams) gij is some kind of in-between form, I think, not too direct and too formal. The jij is often considered unnatural indeed.
     

    mataripis

    Senior Member
    In Tagalog , You= Ikaw commonlly used in most grammars. It is informal form. If you knew the person very well and you heard his/her speech, you may say " Ikaw ba yang nagsasalitang iyan?(Are you the one speaking?)* When you are talking to someone, a stranger and you are not sure his status/position/rank, the word "You" here is "Kayo"= Kayo po ba ang natawag kanina?(Are you the one calling a while ago?)** But if you found someone mystical, the "you" here is "Sila"= Sino po Sila? (who are you/they?)
     
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