same than, same as, same that

Tadeo

Senior Member
Español (México)
Good evening!!!

I've been wondering if there is a difference in the usage of the previous expressions when comparing something;so this is what I found:

This X is the same as mine.
This X is the same than mine.
THis X is the same that the one I have.( sme that mine sounds awful).

So that leads us to to the followig questions:

1) Can you explain in wich situations you use same that?
I mean apparently it introduces some kind of explanation:
He is the same man that I saw at the bus station that day.
So it can't be interchanged with same as or that, that easilyt right?


2) Are same than and same as fully interchangeable?
E.g.
Are mexicans same as chicanos?
Are mexicans same than chicanos? (or maybe with same than the correct sentence would be Are mexicans the same people than chicanos, because same than compares to nouns¿?)

Is there a difference in the intention/meaning of this sentence?
Is there a difference in the use of same as and same than?

Thanks for your help.
I apologize if my example offends anyone, but that is the only think I found in the web; I didn't mean to be disrespectful.
 
  • micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    The correct expression is 'the same as'. I've never heard 'the same than'

    Or maybe it's an obscure way of saying it that I'm not aware of.
    :)
     

    Tadeo

    Senior Member
    Español (México)
    Well, micafe, I think you are right! I just found a link that supports your answer.

    But I'm still a little bit mixed up, you can say better than, worse than, but never same than???

    Because if that is true, let me tell you I'm about to kill my elementary school english teacher! :)
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Well, micafe, I think you are right! I just found a link that supports your answer.

    But I'm still a little bit mixed up, you can say better than, worse than, but never same than???

    Because if that is true, let me tell you I'm about to kill my elementary school english teacher! :)

    You should see the teachers I had in school.. I'd kill to hear them speak English today that I speak the language. I'm sure that would be incredible hilarious.

    To answer your question: Yes, in comparatives... when one is 'more' than the other you use 'than': bigger than, smaller than, colder than, warmer than, more interesting than, less interesting than.

    When they are the same you always use 'as'. This is the same as this.

    If you use another adjective you put the adjective between two 'as':

    My house is as big as yours.

    John is as tall as Pete, but Nick is taller than them.

    :)
     

    Montag

    New Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi,

    In my opinion, you can definitely say "He's the same man that/who came to the party" or "He is the same actor (that) I met last night". So:

    Same as :tick:
    Same that/who :tick: (before a clause)
    Same than :cross:
     

    mnewcomb71

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Most non native speakers that I know who are from a Spanish speaking or French speaking country incorrectly say "that same than". It can only be "the same as" unless, as Montag says, there is a clause following "same that" or "same who".
     

    mitrado

    New Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    First of all...

    Hi, everybody... I just found out about this forum! :-D

    Now...

    Hi,

    In my opinion, you can definitely say "He's the same man that/who came to the party" or "He is the same actor (that) I met last night". So:

    Same as :tick:
    Same that/who :tick: (before a clause)
    Same than :cross:

    Sure you can say "same that" or " same who"... but the doubt was about making comparisons...
    In these cases, you're not really comparing anything...

    See ya!
     

    jp.t

    New Member
    French french
    I think that in the sentence
    "He's the same man that came to the party"
    "that/who" is really linking "man" to its complement "came to the party" and has nothing to do with the comparison part of the sentence

    We could say (though it's a bit confusing):
    "He's the same man that came to the party as the man that stole my bag"
    "as" is back again to mark comparison
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    I think that in the sentence
    "He's the same man that came to the party"
    "that/who" is really linking "man" to its complement "came to the party" and has nothing to do with the comparison part of the sentence

    We could say (though it's a bit confusing):
    "He's the same man that came to the party as the man that stole my bag"
    "as" is back again to mark comparison
    The comparison is marked semantically by 'same'. Whether it's same that/who or same as.

    That being said, your sentence doesn't sound quite right to me. Perhaps either of the following:
    He's the same man that came to the party and stole my bag.
    The man that came to the party is the same man that stole my bag. The context might be slighty different.

    Of course, there are other ways to say it. For example:
    That man in the party was the one who'd stolen my bag.
    That man in the party and the one who stole my bag are one and the same.
    ...
     
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