Same to you (reply to an offense or insult)

keramus

Senior Member
Persian
Hello everybody

Can we use Same to you as a reply to an offense?
For example:
My sister tells me:
You are such an idiot
And I reply:
Same to you.
I mean you are an idiot as well (by saying it to my sister)
Is same to you correct and idiomatic in English as a reply to an offense?

If it's not , what would a native speaker suggest?


Thank you in advance.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Hello everybody

    Can we use Same to you as a reply to an offense?
    For example:
    My sister tells me:
    You are such an idiot
    And I reply:
    Same to you.
    I mean you are an idiot as well (by saying it to my sister)
    Is same to you correct and idiomatic in English as a reply to an offense?

    If it's not , what would a native speaker suggest?


    Thank you in advance.
    Seriously, NO, I cannot think of a time when an adult would say this, unless they were trying to be funny to defuse the argument. It is something children under 5 say before they learn more sophisticated ways to be offensive or just argue with their siblings / friends. Anyone fully grown saying it would sound pretty ridiculous to me and it would make me laugh.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Can we use Same to you as a reply to an offense?
    This is a mindless response by children or others who cannot articulate an appropriate response.

    There's no single response. It depends upon many things, including context.

    Otherwise, Wyoming Sue's "scornful silence" s probably the best.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In my primary school we used to say 'Same to you, with knobs on'. That carried considerable invective impetus and made us laugh.

    Different people react in different ways to insults, so I don't see how we can safely recommend an appropriate response.

    When someone shouted at me at work, something which happened occasionally, I used to say, in as airy a way as I could muster, 'No time now for apology', when I didn't respect them much, and 'Don't shout at me, I find it most unimpressive', when I did.

    If this happened in the street with some stranger, I used to say 'Are you often given to these irrational outbursts?', but then I was quick on my feet in those days. On one memorable occasion that response caused the other person to burst into tears, so we went to a pub and he told me his woes, which were indeed dramatic and distressing. He said I had helped him greatly, so I was glad I'd used my dangerous response.
     
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