Sanskrit: असिक्त-भूमि asikta bhumi

john welch

Senior Member
English-Australian creole
This is "un-irrigated land", and Bhoomi Nath (land of hot spring of master Nathas) and Deva Bhoomi (gods' abode) indicate that "bhoomi" has a wider sense than just the earth as land. Does "bhoomi" carry the sense of watered land and land with water from springs?
 
  • tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    This is "un-irrigated land", and Bhoomi Nath (land of hot spring of master Nathas) and Deva Bhoomi (gods' abode) indicate that "bhoomi" has a wider sense than just the earth as land. Does "bhoomi" carry the sense of watered land and land with water from springs?

    I would say the translation of "land of hot springs of Nathas" is wrong. Naath Bhuumi simply means "Land of the Naaths".
     

    nineth

    Senior Member
    Hindi, Telugu
    This is "un-irrigated land", and Bhoomi Nath (land of hot spring of master Nathas) and Deva Bhoomi (gods' abode) indicate that "bhoomi" has a wider sense than just the earth as land. Does "bhoomi" carry the sense of watered land and land with water from springs?

    Bhoomi is just land. The 'hot spring' stuff in the translation might be coming in from some context (external to it).
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    This is "un-irrigated land", and Bhoomi Nath (land of hot spring of master Nathas) and Deva Bhoomi (gods' abode) indicate that "bhoomi" has a wider sense than just the earth as land. Does "bhoomi" carry the sense of watered land and land with water from springs?
    bhuumi means not only ''land, territory'' but its principal meaning is ''the earth'' and ''soil, ground''. bhuumi-naath means ''protector/lord of the earth'', used to call a king. deva-bhuumi can be translated as ''land of gods'' or ''heaven''.
    bhuumi does not carry a specifical sense of watered land but asikta-bhuumi has just the opposite meaning: unwatered, not irrigated land, as you rightly state.
     
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    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    Absolutely, I really have nothing to add to the excellent responses from my three friends above, apart from to say that the sense of water in asiktabhūmi comes solely from asikta-, which is from the root √sic- ("pour out, sprinkle, water (as in plants (this is the meaning we have here, as in watered land))"). Specifically, it is the past passive participle sikta- "watered" (√sic- + -ta-) with the privative prefix a- giving the meaning "not watered, unirrigated".
     

    john welch

    Senior Member
    English-Australian creole
    Thanks. However, it appears that a bhoomi is Deva under these conditions:
    Himachal Pradesh_ [The district has wide variety of attractions like snow covered mighty mountain peaks, adventurous treks, rugged terrains, imposing monasteries, perennial rivers, beautiful lakes, glaciers and forts.]
    **
    Half of the details are about water, like Bhoomi Nathas hot springs near Mumbai. A bhoomi with water would be especially described as "Land", good land, as a distinct type of land compared with normal soil and territory.
    Do you agree that a spiritual teacher would think in this way?
    (A similar idea is Persian Avestan pairidaeza "round shaped" park-land with water.)
     
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    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Perhaps it would be easier to respond to your query if you gave more context where this word is used.
     

    john welch

    Senior Member
    English-Australian creole
    In Bali, Indonesia the word bumi means "land" and it appears that Hindu Balinese influence reached Aboriginal people when ngartja guru (ngajahin guru?) teachers brought Vedic traditions . Today , Boomi is a place with hot springs near a river in dry, inland Australia where a Vedic-type legend is known for 1200 kms along the Barka river, of Barkindji people. (Ring balin, Parampari, Manarah, Peindjalang, Danya, Pundu are words used in the Aboriginal teaching). Boomi is in the land of Kamilaroi people, where kamil means "a man's main soul", like Persian, Urdu, Sindhi kamil.
     

    Wolverine9

    Senior Member
    American English
    ^ kamil (kaamil) doesn't mean "a man's main soul" in Persian, Urdu, or Sindhi. I think you're mistakenly connecting words from different languages because of a chance phonetic resemblance. A Google search reveals that boomi as used in Australia is of aboriginal origin and is believed to have such meanings as "a piece of wood" or possibly "brackish water." Neither of these possible meanings is connected to the Skt. bhuumi- "land, earth, soil."

    In addition, many people with ancient beliefs have similar types of legends. It doesn't necessarily mean that they are connected or that the Ausralian boomi is somehow related to Skt. bhuumi-.
     
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    john welch

    Senior Member
    English-Australian creole
    teaching). Kamilaroi people, where kamil means "a man's main soul", like Persian, Urdu, Sindhi kamil.
    It is like kamil: [" translated as "perfect" or "the Perfect One". It is also used in Urdu, Persian and Sindhi meaning "complete".] In Java, Indonesia it means "a man's spirit at his grave".
    It's possible that a spiritual teacher in Australia used the term "bhoomi" in a spiritual aspect, as with "Deva Bhoomi". Indra made healing pools of water in Bali, and the Indratataka pool of Angkor Wat, and evidently is named at an Australian place.
    I can't prove anything but am exploring all possibilites when so many words in this context in Australia are correct usage of vocabulary. There are about 200 Indonesoan loan-words in north Australia with around 50% being Sanskritic-Indonesian.
     

    nineth

    Senior Member
    Hindi, Telugu
    It is like kamil: [" translated as "perfect" or "the Perfect One". It is also used in Urdu, Persian and Sindhi meaning "complete".] In Java, Indonesia it means "a man's spirit at his grave".
    It's possible that a spiritual teacher in Australia used the term "bhoomi" in a spiritual aspect, as with "Deva Bhoomi". Indra made healing pools of water in Bali, and the Indratataka pool of Angkor Wat, and evidently is named at an Australian place.
    I can't prove anything but am exploring all possibilites when so many words in this context in Australia are correct usage of vocabulary. There are about 200 Indonesoan loan-words in north Australia with around 50% being Sanskritic-Indonesian.

    You might want to look at
    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/05/01/1218726110

    recently linked from a /. post on it.
     

    john welch

    Senior Member
    English-Australian creole
    Thank you. This implies that Sanskrit was the Australian language before PIE branched and Vedas were known in Aust then, but didn't appear in SE Asia until Indian ships arrived from around 2000 years ago.
    Boomi is in dry country where the river is 2 days walking-distance and Aboriginals inhabited watered regions. In drought times, Boomi water-springs would have supported permanent local life when dry land would not.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Thank you. This implies that Sanskrit was the Australian language before PIE branched and Vedas were known in Aust then, but didn't appear in SE Asia until Indian ships arrived from around 2000 years ago.
    Boomi is in dry country where the river is 2 days walking-distance and Aboriginals inhabited watered regions. In drought times, Boomi water-springs would have supported permanent local life when dry land would not.
    These matters are certainly intriguing but the link to strictly taken language matters is not evident beyond any doubt. I would rather you reposted your query in the Etymology and History of Languages forum (you can find it in the index) because the chances are much higher you can benefit from that forum, as your question is not exclusively related to Sanskrit.
     

    john welch

    Senior Member
    English-Australian creole
    (Bhumi seems to imply water in a spiritual context:
    [Mother Bhumi, .. a woman with four arms and a green complexion.

    Prithvi Sukta (Bhumi Sukta) .. of the Atharva Veda (AVS 12.1), ..
    • Earth in which lie the sea, the river and other waters,
      in which food and cornfields have come to be,
      in which lives all that breathes and that moves,
      May she confer on us the finest of her yield.
      Earth, in which the waters, common to all,
      moving on all sides, flow unfailingly, day and night, .])
     

    tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    (Bhumi seems to imply water in a spiritual context:
    [Mother Bhumi, .. a woman with four arms and a green complexion.

    Prithvi Sukta (Bhumi Sukta) .. of the Atharva Veda (AVS 12.1), ..
    • Earth in which lie the sea, the river and other waters,
      in which food and cornfields have come to be,
      in which lives all that breathes and that moves,
      May she confer on us the finest of her yield.
      Earth, in which the waters, common to all,
      moving on all sides, flow unfailingly, day and night, .])

    I fear you are doing all the implication here.

    But quick question: why would anyone want to live on earth where there was no water? No civilization can spring up where there is no water....Plants need water and soil to survive. So do humans.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    John Welch, it is okay that you add more information to your thread but please refer back to all the post of mine. They are based on factual information. It is obvious to praise (the Goddess) Earth for water in the hot conditions of the Indian Subcontinent. Besides, I repeat the request to re-post this query to another forum because of your satisfaction.
     

    asanga

    Member
    Indonesian
    The traditional vyutpatti (derivation) of bhūmi is: भवन्ति भूतान्यस्यामिति। भू+"भुवः कित्।" उणा० ४।४५। अवलम्बः मिः १ स च कित्।


    "Existent things exist on it," therefore it is called bhūmi. The verbal root bhū (to be, to exist) with the kṛt-suffix mi does not take guṇa due to uṇādi sūtra 4.45.


    The word is derived from the verbal root meaning "to exist", so the main sense is that the earth supports and carries all existence, not just water. The Atharva-veda hymn also stresses this by repeating no dadhātu at the end of almost every verse. This is a play on the verbal root dhā, which can mean both "to bestow, to bring, to give" and "to support, to bear, to hold." So the prayer plays on the literal meaning of bhūmi as "bearer of existence" by asking both "May the earth bear us" and "May the earth give us". The hymn as a whole makes it clear that the earth bears/gives all good things, not just water.
     
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