Sanskrit:इन्द्रशर्मा नाम ब्रह्मणोऽस्माकं सहाध्यायि मित्रम् ।

MindBoggle

Senior Member
Danish. English from childhood
Hello everybody.
My Sanskrit book has:

इन्द्रशर्मा नाम ब्रह्मणोऽस्माकं सहाध्यायि मित्रम् ।

- which makes no sense to me.

I get: Indrasharma's name, a brahmin, our co-pupil, is a friend.

- or something like that. But it must be wrong. Please help!

Greetings
MindBoggle
 
  • Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    Correct me if I'm wrong anyone, but I think you're bascially there aren't you?

    A Brahman named Indraśarman is our friend and fellow-student.

    इन्द्रशर्मा = nom sg masc of Indraśarman- "Indraśarman"
    नाम = "named" (although given by monier-williams as an ind, in truth it is (as he also, actually, points out) the acc sg of nāman- "name")
    ब्रह्मणो < ब्रह्मणः = nom sg masc of brahman- "Brahman"
    ऽस्माकं < अस्माकम् = gen pl of the hypothetical root asmad-, the 1st person pronoun
    सहाध्यायि = nom sg neut of sahādyāyin (compound of saha + adhyāyin-) "fellow-student"
    मित्रम् = nom sg neut of mitra- "friend"
     

    MindBoggle

    Senior Member
    Danish. English from childhood
    Correct me if I'm wrong anyone, but I think you're bascially there aren't you?

    A Brahman named Indraśarman is our friend and fellow-student.

    Ah! Of course. I was unsure of इन्द्रशर्मा (is it a compound? a name? some obscure deva? or what?) and got further confused by all the nominatives. I guess I had the dots all figured out then, I just couldn't connect them.

    Thank you for your help! :)
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    As I said इन्द्रशर्मा is the nom sg of इन्द्रशर्मन् (indraśarman-), which Monier-Williams simply gives as "m. N. of a man." I can't tell you anything about him, I'm afraid, but an extremely quick google search has him turning up on a Buddhist website and in a few inscriptions. It's likely that the author (this is Deshpande again, right?) simply borrowed a Sanskrit name for the sake of the example and I doubt who he was is really very important. It does seem, of course, to be a compound of इन्द्र indra- and शरमन् śarman- and Monier-Williams gives us this very useful little tidbit:
    "joy, bliss, comfort, delight, happiness (often at the end of names of Brāhmans, just as varman is added to the names of Kshatriyas, and gupta to those of Vaiṡyas) Yājñ. MBh. Kāv. &c."
    Presumably, of course, the name means 'delighting in Indra' as a bahuvrīhi compound, so it's, in other words, 'he who has delight in Indra' - I think.
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    I have nothing useful to add after the excellent explanation by Au101 (as also in the other Sanskrit post), however, shouldn't it be ब्राह्मणः instead of ब्रह्मणः?
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    Incidentally, I am learning some Old Persian these days, and there also exists this weird "naming syntax" using the word नाम| But interestingly, there नाम changes to नामा when introducing a feminine name.
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    I have nothing useful to add after the excellent explanation by Au101 (as also in the other Sanskrit post), however, shouldn't it be ब्राह्मणः instead of ब्रह्मणः?

    Yes I think you must be right! I often get ब्राह्मण and ब्रहमन् confused, not helped massively by the neut and masc versions of ब्रह्मन् and the English translations, so I didn't spot it. If it is ब्रह्मणः then it must surely be from ब्रह्मन्, which would have to make it an abl/gen sg, which is no good at all. I suggest you're almost certainly right and it should be:

    ब्राह्मणो < ब्राह्मणः = nom sg masc of brāhmaṇa- "Brahman"

    MindBoggle, I don't suppose you could check for us? :)

    Edit: I managed to track down the sentence in the book, and it is ब्राह्मणो, so that's that mystery solved. Thanks for pointing it out to us Dib! :)
     
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