Sanskrit, Hindi: etaSHa nuH pitaa yasya shvashuras tasya pitaa me shvashuraH

MindBoggle

Senior Member
Danish. English from childhood
Hello everybody! :)

Of a man next to her, a woman says:

etaSHa nuH pitaa yasya shvashuras tasya pitaa me shvashuraH.

Then she asks:

sa naa tasyaa naaryaa bhartaa vaa bhraataa vaa putro vaa?


I can't figure this out. :mad: The first statement says something like: 'This man's father, the one whose father-in-law, whose father is my father-in-law.'

:confused:

This is very confusing, and I cannot answer the question, although the meaning is clear to me:

'Is this man the woman's husband, or brother, or son?'

Can anybody help, please?

MindBoggle
 
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  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    The meaning is also clear to me thanks to this good piece of Sanskrit which because of its simplicity not even more exquise.

    I can imagine this dialog was meant to be mind-boggling. I can tell a couple of suggestions off the top of my head but we would need discussion and that would expand beyond a language question.

    Edit:I can see that you edited your post due to transliteration. Your transliteration is perfect!
     

    MindBoggle

    Senior Member
    Danish. English from childhood
    Yes, now the transliteration is good, before the edit it wasn't. ;)

    And yes, I'm sure it's meant to be a riddle. We have similar ones in my country, and they can be hard enough even in one's own language. How would you translate the first sentence, Marrish?
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    etaSHa nuH pitaa yasya shvashuras tasya pitaa me shvashuraH.

    Then she asks:

    sa naa tasyaa naaryaa bhartaa vaa bhraataa vaa putro vaa?

    Assuming that the first word is "etasya", it means:
    The father of the man(1), whose father-in-law is this man's(2) father, is my father-in-law.
    Is that man(2) that woman's husband, or brother or son?

    Sorry, I had to introduce the man(1) in my translation because of the syntactic difference between the two languages, and probably thereby solved the riddle. :)
     
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    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    Btw, it's strange to see nṛ in genitive (nuḥ). Monier-William's says the actual abl-gen attested in Vedic is náraḥ; and I believe it is not a common word in later Sanskrit.
     
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