Sanskrit/Hindi: I see rain in my future

BrittyJ

New Member
English
Hi guys,

I need to translate this sentence " I see rain in my future." into either Hindi or Sansksrit. It would be really great to get a translation thats not from google lol

THANK YOU! :)
 
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  • Wolverine9

    Senior Member
    American English
    Welcome to the forum BrittyJ! Here is my attempt to translate the sentence into Hindi.

    mujhe baarish dikh rahii hai apne bhavishya meN.
     

    BrittyJ

    New Member
    English
    Thank you! Is it possible you can write it in symbols? I have to write this for a poem for class. I'm having issues with like sentence structure =\
     

    BrittyJ

    New Member
    English
    Yea cause this is what I got so far मैं देखता हूं भविष्य में वर्षा and i'm not sure if i written it correctly.
     

    Wolverine9

    Senior Member
    American English
    That's an alternate way to say roughly the same thing. A few corrections:

    मैं अपने भविष्य में वर्षा देखता हूँ

    maiN apne bhavishya meN varshaa dekhtaa huuN.

    If you are a female, change
    देखता (dekhtaa) to देखती (dekhtii)


     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Hi guys,

    I need to translate this sentence " I see rain in my future." into either Hindi or Sansksrit. It would be really great to get a translation thats not from google lol

    THANK YOU! :)
    Hi,
    Here is a translation of 'I see rain in my future' into Sanskrit.

    ममभविष्ये वर्षाम्पश्यामि। mamabhaviSHye varSHaampashyaami.

    I request Sanskrit knowing friends to confirm or correct it.
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    Hi marrish, my friend :) I think that's a very reasonable suggestion - I have a couple of comments, though, about mamabhaviṣya-. Firstly, if we are to compound asmad- with bhaviṣya- we can't use the genitive singular. In compound, we would normally have mad-, i.e.: madbhaviṣya-. A good example of this we can find in the texts would be something like: matsakhi- "my friend". However, there is a rule (which is often violated) that a single word should not have two grammatical functions. So here, we have I/me as the subject of the verb (even though, here, you haven't actually included the subject aham overtly) and as the possessor of future in the genitive. I think, in general, the more usual construction would be to use sva-, so I would recommend the following ammendment:

    स्वभविष्ये वर्षाम्पश्यामि । svabhaviṣye varṣām paśyāmi.

    (N.B.: I've observed academic transliteration practices and separated the words, but the Devanãgarī does, of course, just have: svabhaviṣye varṣāmpaśyāmi.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^I was actually counting on you to chime in and I had a hard time weighing arguments pro and contra the use of sva as it would perhaps lend towards implying ''my own''. Your suggestion of using mad- is just perfect! Thank you.
     

    asanga

    Member
    Indonesian
    Only other thing I'd suggest is that, by A. 8.4.59 वा पदान्तस्य, the substitution of anusvāra with a homo-organic nasal at the end of a word is optional. Visually I think it looks better as:

    स्वभविष्ये वर्षां पश्यामि ।

    It's also worth pointing out that in a hot and dry country like northern India, "seeing rains in the future" has a very different connotation than in English. Lots of poetry compares God or a lover to the longed-for rain cloud that will bring sweet relief and cooling rain at the end of the unbearable hot season. Although once the rains finally arrive, there's often too much, as this monsoon has once again sadly demonstrated. But in Sanskrit literature, when someone speaks about future rain, it's almost always with a positive connotation.
     
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