Sanskrit: Is Vatarana a Sanskrit word?

mannoushka

Senior Member
Iran/Persian
"Vatarana" sounds like the root word for the Persian "taraane", which means melody, song. I'm not sure about the word being Sanskrit, but would like to know if it is so. Furthermore, what does it mean, if anything, to a native speaker of any of the Indian languages, please? Thank you in advance for your contributions!
 
  • Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    "Vatarana" sounds like the root word for the Persian "taraane", which means melody, song. I'm not sure about the word being Sanskrit, but would like to know if it is so. Furthermore, what does it mean, if anything, to a native speaker of any of the Indian languages, please? Thank you in advance for your contributions!
    Well, according to Platts, the Persian ترانه taraanah / taraaneh, also used in Urdu, has the following etymology:

    Pترانه tarāna(S. ताड्य+मान, rt. तड्), s.m. Modulation, melody, harmony, symphony; voice, song, tune, air; trill, shake, quaver; a kind of song; an exercise in singing:—tarāna-pardāz, adj. & s.m. Composing melodies or songs; a composer of melodies, &c.

    For ताड्यमान, Apte gives:
    ताड्यमान tāḍyamāna a. Being beaten or struck; श्रोतुर्वितन्त्रीरिव ताड्यमाना Ku.1.45; ताड्यमानः किं न ब्रूयात् Mu.5. -नः A musical instrument struck with a stick &c. (as a drum).

    The Sanskrit वितरण vitaraNa = gift / donation / grant (plus other usages!)
    and there is,
    वैतरण vaitaraNa a. (î) intending to cross a river: î, f. N. of a sacred river in Kali&ndot;ga; N. of the river of hell.

    Can you tell us the context / where you found it?
     

    mannoushka

    Senior Member
    Iran/Persian
    Well, according to Platts, the Persian ترانه taraanah / taraaneh, also used in Urdu, has the following etymology:

    Pترانه tarāna(S. ताड्य+मान, rt. तड्), s.m. Modulation, melody, harmony, symphony; voice, song, tune, air; trill, shake, quaver; a kind of song; an exercise in singing:—tarāna-pardāz, adj. & s.m. Composing melodies or songs; a composer of melodies, &c.

    For ताड्यमान, Apte gives:
    ताड्यमान tāḍyamāna a. Being beaten or struck; श्रोतुर्वितन्त्रीरिव ताड्यमाना Ku.1.45; ताड्यमानः किं न ब्रूयात् Mu.5. -नः A musical instrument struck with a stick &c. (as a drum).

    The Sanskrit वितरण vitaraNa = gift / donation / grant (plus other usages!)
    and there is,
    वैतरण vaitaraNa a. (î) intending to cross a river: î, f. N. of a sacred river in Kali&ndot;ga; N. of the river of hell.

    Can you tell us the context / where you found it?

    :confused: This is me, after searching hopelessly for "context"! What I did find, to my bemusement, was another forum right here in the Wordreference devoted to discussing etymologies!

    In any case, now that I know the word 'taranaa' is common between Persian and Urdu, the next question is, well, what's the etymology of this word? However, since this is not the right forum for asking it, I'll withhold the inquiry.

    Thank you for the information, Faylasoof! I particularly delighted over the discovery that there was a verb in the world which stood for 'intend to cross a river', not actually to do it, but to think about doing it!
     

    Wolverine9

    Senior Member
    American English
    I particularly delighted over the discovery that there was a verb in the world which stood for 'intend to cross a river', not actually to do it, but to think about doing it!

    It's actually an adjective rather than a verb. But it's not connected to the Persian taraaneh.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I don't suppose you mean "avatarana", do you?
    avatarana [ ava-tar-ana ] n. coming down, de scent: -ma&ndot;gala, n. solemn welcome; -ita vya, fp. n. one must descend; -târa, m. de scent (esp. of gods to earth); incarnation; manifestation: -na, n. causing to descend; laying aside, -mantra, m. spell causing one to descend from the air; -târin, a. appearing, entering; -titîrshu, a. wishing to descend.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Well, according to Platts, the Persian ترانه taraanah / taraaneh, also used in Urdu, has the following etymology:

    Pترانه tarāna(S.ताड्य+मान, rt. तड्), s.m. Modulation, melody, harmony, symphony; voice, song, tune, air; trill, shake, quaver; a kind of song; an exercise in singing:—tarāna-pardāz, adj. & s.m. Composing melodies or songs; a composer of melodies, &c.

    For ताड्यमान, Apte gives:
    ताड्यमान tāḍyamānaa. Being beaten or struck; श्रोतुर्वितन्त्रीरिव ताड्यमाना Ku.1.45; ताड्यमानः किं न ब्रूयात् Mu.5. -नः A musical instrument struck with a stick &c. (as a drum).

    The Sanskrit वितरण vitaraNa = gift / donation / grant (plus other usages!)
    and there is,
    वैतरण vaitaraNa a. (î) intending to cross a river: î, f. N. of a sacred river in Kali&ndot;ga; N. of the river of hell.

    Can you tell us the context / where you found it?

    :confused: This is me, after searching hopelessly for "context"! What I did find, to my bemusement, was another forum right here in the Wordreference devoted to discussing etymologies!

    In any case, now that I know the word 'taranaa' is common between Persian and Urdu, the next question is, well, what's the etymology of this word? However, since this is not the right forum for asking it, I'll withhold the inquiry.

    Thank you for the information, Faylasoof! I particularly delighted over the discovery that there was a verb in the world which stood for 'intend to cross a river', not actually to do it, but to think about doing it!
    Yes mannoushka, we have a forum fully devoted to etymologies but here we sometimes go into short discussions on etymologies for clarification when discussing a word.
    As for ترانه tarāna / taraanah,I mention above in my old post (now highlighted in green) what Sanskrit term it is derived from, i.e. ताड्यमान tāḍyamāna.
     

    Wolverine9

    Senior Member
    American English
    As I had suspected, the etymology provided in Platts for this word is incorrect. The root taD- "strike" is of Dravidian origin, so tāḍyamāna is not the cognate of tarāneh, nor is it likely to have been the source of a loan. The etymology of tarāneh is either what I suggested in the other forum or something else entirely.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    "Vatarana" sounds like the root word for the Persian "taraane", which means melody, song. I'm not sure about the word being Sanskrit, but would like to know if it is so. Furthermore, what does it mean, if anything, to a native speaker of any of the Indian languages, please? Thank you in advance for your contributions!
    Could you please let us know where you heard/saw/read this word...namely the source of it.
     
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