Sat and sitting, stood and standing

< Previous | Next >
Status
Not open for further replies.

Allypally

Senior Member
English - UK
Am I the only one whose flesh crawls when someone says, "Here I am, sat on the sofa watching TV" or a BBC reporter broadcasts "I'm stood just outside the walls of Amatrice", and suchlike? In the olden days we used to say "sitting" and "standing" and it seems to me that the ubiquitous "sat" and "stood" started to creep in about 10 years ago and are now more or less universal. Now I'm not such a pedant as to resist a language evolving in whatever way it wants to go, but I do find this usage extremely ugly! Moreover, in the dark ages "sat" and "stood" would be transitive, e.g. "I stood the vase on the window sill" or "She sat the toddler in the buggy". The BBC has rolled over without a murmur and I would guess that about 90% of their journalists now say "sat" and "stood" - even the more venerable ones. Just waiting for Melvyn Bragg to join the turncoats! Am I a lone voice here?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Allypally. As far as I know, this habit hasn't reached the U.S. yet. I think I'm glad about that. We generate plenty of annoying language on our own.:rolleyes:
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    There are already a few threads where this feature of informal, spoken British English is discussed.

    "We were sat" -- a new UK trend?
    the woman that sat / was sitting on the chair is ...
    Sitting vs sat

    I see it a lot in the newspapers, when someone is being quoted verbatim. A lot of people do speak like that, and I don't hold it against them:p.

    I think that journalists and reporters do tend towards increasingly informal language, in an attempt to engage the average listener I suppose. It annoys me sometimes, if the speaker seems to be using it in an ingratiatingly "matey" way. On the other hand, this may be one of the few characteristics of British speech that are still going strong and not being gradually replaced by more "cool" expressions from across the Atlantic.;)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Am I the only one whose flesh crawls when someone says, "Here I am, sat on the sofa watching TV" or a BBC reporter broadcasts "I'm stood just outside the walls of Amatrice", and suchlike?
    Possibly. It doesn't bother me at all. I've heard people using such forms all my life. It's not in my normal idiolect, but I don't see any reason to condemn regional dialects, any more than I condemn people from the south of England who can't pronounce "bath" or "grass" properly. :D (Although I did object to Tony Blair putting on his "common man" accent.)
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If the previous threads helpfully linked to above do not answer the question, feel free to join the discussion in any relevant thread. This thread is closed.

    Florentia52, moderator
     
    Status
    Not open for further replies.
    < Previous | Next >
    Top