sat or seated

Peterrobertini7

Banned
cuban spanish
I would appeciate the natives which verb is more proper in these sentences :
The students are seated in their chairs
The students are sat in their chairs
I'm sat in my chair
I'm seated in my chair

Both verbs To sit and to seat are transitives

are there any rules to choose ones over the others? or both are correct?

Thanks

:)
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I would appeciate the natives which verb is more proper in these sentences :
    The students are seated in their chairs:tick:
    The students are sat in their chairs:cross:
    I'm sat in my chair:cross:
    I'm seated in my chair:tick:
    "sat" is in the past so in the context that you are using, "I am sat in my chair" doesn't work nor does "The students are sat in their chairs".
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Have you seen someone using "I'm sat in my chair"? It isn't standard, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear someone with some dialect use it.

    I agree with the other posters that 'seated' is the correct term here.
     

    Suspishio

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've heard that used in a jocular context. "I'm sat in this chair, minding my own business, when this geezer comes up to me ....."

    Any other Brits agree?
     

    Peterrobertini7

    Banned
    cuban spanish
    "sat" is in the past so in the context that you are using, "I am sat in my chair" doesn't work nor does "The students are sat in their chairs".
    Thanks for your answer, but I still wonder why did you choose one (SEATED) over the past participle (SAT) if both are transitive verbs??
    or when you use sit or seat instead.
    Thanks again

    :confused:
     

    Ecuanime

    Member
    English (U.S.)
    You would use "seated" to be descriptive. So you ask: Where is Bob? He is seated there in the third row. In Spanish it is equivalent to: estar sentado

    "Sat" is more of an active voice. You would not need any helping or linking verbs to go with it (for example, you don't say are sat).
     

    KhanLee

    New Member
    English - United States
    Are you sure they are both transitive? I think "to sit" is an intransitive. Am I wrong?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Transitive: to seat (somebody). Past = sat/seated. Past participle and adjective = seated.
    Intransitive: to sit. Past = sat. Past participle = sat. The perfect is formed with 'have', not with 'be'.

    So you shouldn't say The students are sat in their chairs :cross:. Either they have sat, or they are seated (i.e. someone has seated them in their chairs). It's a common mistake.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    They can be transitive:

    "I sat them around the table with orders to come to an agreement. To ensure this happened, I seated my mother-in-law at the head of the table."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top