Saudi Arabic: ترا - ترى

suma7

New Member
English
Is there an exact translation for the word "ترا" in English? I know it's used in Saudi Arabia...not sure which other dialects.

Can you please provide me with some examples of how/when to use this word?!

Thanks!!
 
  • Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Hello,

    "taraa" is used to say "you see" I think. It's in Najdi Arabic as well as Gulf Arabic dialects. It also exists in Algerian and Moroccan Arabic, but the form is a bit different ("araa") and Algerian use it much more than Moroccan.

    It's a kind of mean to introduce sentences, or saying "you see" (or "tu vois" in French).

    Sorry, I'm not able to give you an accurate translation of this expression but still, I give a try (in Najdi dialect):

    "tarani Subu7, bashtari hatif jadid" (you see me, tomorrow, I'll buy a new phone).

    I don't know if my example is accurate or even useful to you, but I don't know exactly how to use it, since I don't use it. But I've heard it.

    Ps: just to avoid this "mistake", it's "Saudi dialects", as there are many in the country ;).
     
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    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    An example, if there were an annoying boy and you want them to stay put or be quiet...etc
    اجلس ولا ترى بضربك
    Sit down, stay put, be quiet or else, I'll smack you
     

    Schem

    Senior Member
    Najdi Arabic
    There isn't an exact all-encompassing English translation that I can think of but possibly many translations depending on the context. Generally, the particle is used to add extra information that is sometimes temporal or confirmational/negational and although it is derived from the verb "to see" (as Hamza correctly points out) it has little to do with that meaning today and most people who use it aren't conscious of its roots and use it in very versatile ways. Some examples off the top of my head with their respective translations:

    Tarai re7t تراي رحت (I've already gone)
    Ja flaan tara جا فلان ترا (So-and-so came by the way)
    Tarak thaki تراك ذكي (You are [indeed] intelligent)
    And of course the example Ayed provided and many others I'm sure..
    "tarani Subu7, bashtari hatif jadid" (you see me, tomorrow, I'll buy a new phone).
    I'm afraid this example is nonsensical for the most part.
     

    Schem

    Senior Member
    Najdi Arabic
    Tarani is used by the majority of Gulf speakers and a considerable portion of Najdi speakers but tarai exists as well and predominates in northern Najd.
     

    aisha93

    Senior Member
    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    It is usually used to warn someone or make someone aware of something.

    For example
    > لا تودين العيال الحديقة اليوم، ترى بكرة/باجر عندهم امتحان (don't take the children to the park today because they have an exam tomorrow)
    > لا تشرب الحليب هذا، ترى تاريخه منتهي (don't drink this milk because it has expired)

    It can also mean (by the way)
    For example > ترى بكرة/باجر مو اجازة (by the way, tomorrow is not holiday/off)
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    ترى in many instances functions the same way as Classical إنّ/فإنّ:

    كل التمر تراه زين
    كل التمر فإنه زين
     

    princeipeazul

    Member
    Filipino
    I'm not a native speaker, but I'm currently learning Arabic and I just want to help. According to Gulf Arabic dictionary, ترى can mean several things:

    1.) well, well then, well now
    Well, today is a holiday.
    ترى، اليوم عطلة

    2.) for your information
    For your information, the new director has come.
    المدير الجديد يا ترى

    3.) because
    Don't go with him because he will upset you.
    لا تسير وياه، ترى يغثك!


    I'm interested to know how these are expressed in different dialects especially in Najdi.
     

    Schem

    Senior Member
    Najdi Arabic
    Except Gassim occupies much of central Najd and we don't use it.

    2.) for your information
    For your information, the new director has come.
    المدير الجديد يا ترى
    This example makes little sense to me especially the addition of a vocative. I would express this natively as المدير الجديد جا تراه almudīr aljedīd ja tarōh or ترا المدير الجديد جا/ي tara almudīr aljedīd ja(y).

    Edit: I just caught on to the writer's transcription of Gulf Arabic gimel as ي. Never mind my confusion.
     

    gbasfora

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    And what about يا ترى ? I wonder , Might you ?

    يا ترى = يا ريت (synonyms ?)

    يا ترى تحفظ ودادي
    والهوى يا ترى ع التلج شو قصص
    يا ترى موجودة و قلبي محفوظ فيها
     
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    gbasfora

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Thank you Analeeh

    a good song for Farid :

    يا ريتني طيرلاطيرحواليك​
    مطرح ما تروح عيوني عليك​
     
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