sauf cas de force majeure telle que définie par la jurisprudence

JPart

New Member
Gibraltar, English
Hi,

I need to translate : sauf cas de force majeure telle que définie par la jurisprudence

Would it be: except in cases of force majeure as defined in the rules

Thanks
 
  • klodaway

    Senior Member
    I'm nothing close to law-buff, but I think that "Force Majeure" has a legal signification in some contexts (I am thinking for one of the Incoterms - International Commercial Terms?) in English, which - I believe - is not the case in French. If that is the case, the translation might be trickier than it looks!

    I might be wrong, if anybody has more information on that...

    klod-
     

    hunternet

    Senior Member
    France - French
    I'm nothing close to law-buff, but I think that "Force Majeure" has a legal signification in some contexts (I am thinking for one of the Incoterms - International Commercial Terms?) in English, which - I believe - is not the case in French. If that is the case, the translation might be trickier than it looks!

    I might be wrong, if anybody has more information on that...

    klod-
    la "force majeure" a une signification légale et faire l'objet d'une clause dans bon nombre de contrats. C'est en gros la même chose en anglais et en français.
     

    candypole

    Senior Member
    australia english
    Except in cases involving unforeseen circumstances as set out in the legislation.

    I'm wondering whether you could translate force majeur here as Act of God. As pointed out above, the phrase exists in English, but not with legal language - at least, I've never seen it.
     

    hunternet

    Senior Member
    France - French
    Except in cases involving unforeseen circumstances as set out in the legislation.:warning:

    "legislation" is "législation" in France, it does not only stand for "jurisprudence"

    I'm wondering whether you could translate force majeur here as Act of God. As pointed out above, the phrase exists in English, but not with legal language - at least, I've never seen it.

    Act of God -> événement imprévisible (il y a un terme consacré dont je ne me souviens plus). The Act of God is only part of the "force majeure".
     

    candypole

    Senior Member
    australia english
    I think the French more often use "textes' for legislation. I suppose jurisprudence would include both legislation and judge's decision, but we wouldn't translate jurisprudence as jurisprudence. The circumstances here don't enable me to say exactly how to translate it - but you could also say 'as defined by law'.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Force majeure is a term used literally without translation in English (at least in the US)

    Except in case of force majeure (as defined by law)
     

    kieran75

    Senior Member
    English
    If I understand correctly, jurisprudence refers to the rulings and decisions of judges, which in English are precedents or case law, which might be summed up by the term Common Law.
     
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