save me (from)

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I check the dictionary finding one of the set collocation of "save" is "save from" :

to prevent (someone) from experiencing something bad, etc. This will save you from having to retype your paper.

However, I read a very famous sentence today: I'm so glad we're friends. It saves me having to pay a therapist.

The writer omits from. I was wondering whether it is grammatically correct. Would you give me some advice? Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes ... but I suspect it only works when the subject is (e.g.) this or it or something that could be replaced with this or it:

    This will save you having to retype your paper.
    It will save you going through the same rigmarole all over again.
    Having a house near the beach
    [It] saves us having to walk a long way when we feel like a swim.

    The verb+structure comes most naturally (to me) when it involves preventing an effort, as in the above examples.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes ... but I suspect it only works when the subject is (e.g.) this or it or something that could be replaced with this or it:

    This will save you having to retype your paper.
    It will save you going through the same rigmarole all over again.
    Having a house near the beach
    [It] saves us having to walk a long way when we feel like a swim.

    The verb+structure comes most naturally (to me) when it involves preventing an effort, as in the above examples.
    Thank you very much.
     
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