Saved in my folder or saved on my folder.

  • C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Exactly.


    However there are some cases where it's tough to decide on whether to use "in" or "on."

    A store can be located "on" or "at" the corner (of two streets). Since we don't think if it as being in the middle of the intersection, we don't say "in the corner." However a chair or a person can be situated "in the corner" (of a room).

    Best,

    cew
     

    luisiher

    Member
    Spanish - Castellano
    I always thought it was “the documents are saved in my folder”. I was asking the question because some of my colleagues always say "saved on my folder" and they are English native speakers I am not.

    Thanks you for the clarification.
     

    halthecomputer

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I always thought it was “the documents are saved in my folder”. I was asking the question because some of my colleagues always say "saved on my folder" and they are English native speakers I am not.

    Thanks you for the clarification.
    You are right, however note that the terminology varies depending on where you are saving it:

    • "They are saved on my computer."
    • "They are saved on my hard drive."
    • "They are saved on this disk."
    • "They are saved in a folder."
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    We use "in" for books and folders.

    Thus if I were reading a book and did not want to converse, I might say, "Not now, I'm in the middle of a good book."

    I've never heard anyone who spoke English as a native say that something was saved "on" his/her folder. We say,
    "That is saved on my desktop" (of a computer)
    but of course it is
    "saved in" the "My Documents" folder.

    Best,

    cew
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Hi!

    I always thought it was “the documents are saved in my folder”. I was asking the question because some of my colleagues always say "saved on my folder" and they are English native speakers I am not.

    Thanks you for the clarification.
    I just realized that we can say that something (an address, or another record usually)

    "is on file"
    (which means that we have it either in our file folders that we maintain or in our computers files or both--and thus that we don't need to obtain it again or elaborate more about it perhaps).

    Thus, "on file" means "in the files we maintain," and it's used to describe the general location of data records (such as addresses). However, what it really says is that we have these data records and can access them/look up the data in them rather than specifying the location of the data records.

    I hope this is not confusing.

    Best,


    cew
     

    luisiher

    Member
    Spanish - Castellano
    Yes, I thing I got it when we say “on file” is when we have recorded something and when “is saved in a file”, it’s referred to location.
    Thanks for your help
    Luisiher
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Yes, that's right. You understand it. "On file" indicates that a record is availabe. "In the/a [particular] file" specifies the location something is saved in.

    The etymology of the English prepositions "in" and "on" is interesting--apparently, to some degree, they share a root:

    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=o&p=4

    (According to the resource above and also according to my offline dictionary, "on" used to be used where we use "in" and "on" was in Old English an unstressed variant of in.)


    Best,

    cew
     
    Last edited:

    luisiher

    Member
    Spanish - Castellano
    These prepositions drive crazy. Now another similar question (I am not sure if I should open a new thread as this is related)

    To improve on or to improve in

    I think is to improve in

    For example I need to improve in my piano skills

    Thanks again
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Hi. Yes this is related to the 'on' and 'in' question, but improve on /in is a different idiom than save on/in and has a different meaning. So I'd start a new thread (the moderators will probably suggest that you do so too).

    Best,
    cew
     
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