Saying '101'

Space2101

New Member
English, U.S.
Do you say this number as "one hundred and one" or just "one hundred one" without the "and"?
 
  • mrbilal87

    Senior Member
    English (NAmE)
    Hi Space2101,
    This was up for discussion a while ago. I personally say it one hundred and one, although in school I was taught to omit the "and". :eek: I believe that in North American English it's considered more correct to read it without the "and", though if I recall correctly, this rule does not apply in BrE.

    Cheers!
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi Space2101,
    This was up for discussion a while ago. I personally say it one hundred and one, although in school I was taught to omit the "and". :eek: I believe that in North American English it's considered more correct to read it without the "and", though if I recall correctly, this rule does not apply in BrE.

    Cheers!
    Correct as far as BE is concerned and, I think, as far as AE is concerned. And sometimes, in BE, a hundred and one.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I have not yet heard or seen any rule or prescription, but by custom spoken AE uses all of these:

    One hundred and one
    One hundred one
    one oh one


    I'm used to hearing them in that order. I don't think any of those would be considered incorrect. In any event, all three forms are commonly understood to refer to 101.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I must say I always thought that "one hundred one" would be the most common for AE. This is mainly from television, though, and probably military-type jargon and films (whoops! "movies").
     

    Erutuon

    Member
    English, USA
    I'd keep the "and" in there, though it's not necessary. Also, I might use "a" in place of "one".

    Generally I say my numbers by hundreds. So, for 121,121,121 I'd say "one hundred and twenty-one million, one hundred and twenty-one thousand, one hundred and twenty-one". I find, though, that many people don't use the "and".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'd keep the "and" in there, though it's not necessary. Also, I might use "a" in place of "one".

    Generally I say my numbers by hundreds. So, for 121,121,121 I'd say "one hundred and twenty-one million, one hundred and twenty-one thousand, one hundred and twenty-one". I find, though, that many people don't use the "and".
    "And" in banking and accounting terms often indicates the decimal point, so "121,121.21" would be "One hundred twenty-one thousand, one hundred twenty-one (dollars) and twenty-one cents." The "dollars" can be omitted since the "and" indicates the dividing line between the dollars and cents. That's one reason why many people do not use the "and" when pronouncing whole-dollar figures.


    Just another note on the "one-oh-one" way of pronouncing this... "101" is often the first course number in a series of college courses in the U.S. As a result, it has become synonymous in American English with "beginning". You'll hear and read such phrases as "that's just Music Business 101" or "Romance 101". In these phrases, it is pronounced "one-oh-one" and it means "beginning X" or "fundamental X" or "basic X". It's often said in response to someone who claims to know a particular subject but demonstrates a shaky grasp of the subject or contradicts a basic guideline, rule or principle of the subject.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    This thread is giving me the willies. It keeps reminding me of "Room 101" in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. It is always pronounced "One oh one" in this context.
     
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