Saying that something A happens except possibly for B means that whenever B is not true A happens.

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Shak32

Member
romanian
Saying that something A happens except possibly for B means that whenever B is not true A happens. Is the word underlined a typo? or head of the relative clause? source
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It doesn't look like a typo to me. What do you think it should say?

    It might be clearer if you read it as 'Saying that something we will refer to as A happens . . . '
     

    Zethin

    Member
    English - United States
    The entire phrase would be "something A", though it's probably easier to read as "some thing A" where "thing" is a verb that occurs and is labeled as "A".

    So, likewise, in the initial phrase "something A", something would be a verb labeled A that happens except possibly for the situation of B.

    This is a logic statement, so what it's saying is "If B doesn't happen, then verb A is guaranteed to happen."
     

    Shak32

    Member
    romanian
    It doesn't look like a typo to me. What do you think it should say?

    It might be clearer if you read it as 'Saying that something we will refer to as A happens . . . '
    Is the 'as' conjunction or preposition?

    I thought it is somekind relative clause but for the word ''happen'' is intransitive and didn't take preposition, I was confused.
     
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