Scab off

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Paulfromitaly

MODerator
Italian
Hello folk and Happy Easter!

An English girl is moaning about people asking her money only because she's well off.

I'm the one who always has money that people scab off me.

I can't understand what she exactly means with "scab off me".
Could it be a misspelling?
Any suggestion?

Cheers.
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    People rely on her to pay for things for them, borrow money from her (probably without paying it back); take advantage of her financially.

    It's very rough slang, another version is to "ponce off" someone, or to "scrounge".
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    People rely on her to pay for things for them, borrow money from her (probably without paying it back); take advantage of her financially.

    It's very rough slang, another version is to "ponce off" someone, or to "scrounge".
    Thanks.
    Would "scab off" be understood all over the UK? What about USA?
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I don't know it's origins, I'm afraid, it seems fairly new to me. If you check Google it seems to be used in various parts of the English speaking world (particularly Australia, but also Canada and the USA), but with the internet slang flies round the world very quickly. Hopefully someone else here will know more.
     

    jlc246

    Member
    English - US
    I don't recognise "scab off me" or "ponce off me". (USA) However, I'm not familiar with a lot of the most current slang or "with it" terms! My 13 year old son doesn't recognise them, so they haven't traveled to the young-teens in his circle.

    I would have guessed the meaning from the context, but I would say "scrounge from me" or "scrounge off me" or "bum off me" in informal/slang conversation/e-mail. I wouldn't say this in writing unless it was a character in a story.

    Thanks for the word puzzle -
     

    Lucy12

    Member
    English, UK
    Hello everyone and Happy Easter.

    I am a 20 year old English girl and I actually think "scab off" sounds quite dated, it is certainly not new slang. It also seems more English to me than American. I think it would be understood everywhere in England, but scrounge off / sponge off might be more common. "Scab off" is certainly pejorative and a bit vulgar though, while "sponge off" is more neutral.

    Also, I don't recognise "ponce off" in this context, to me, "ponce off" means, someone walks off in a sulk. For example, she ponced off when he didn't give her any money...
     

    SweetBird

    Member
    USA english
    Historically, the term "scab" was used to describe someone who crossed the picket line to work during a strike.

    More recently it has been used to describe a freeloader, someone who frequently asks for money or gets friends to buy things for them. So "scab off" would mean to freeload.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Wow no correct answers yet:)
    Paul, you're thinking of "scav"..
    "to scav off someone" - is to take advantage of someone because they are rich, very very common in young English conversations.

    "Look, just cos I have a job doesn't mean everyone has to scav off me"

    "Ah, but how will we afford a pizza? Ah I know, you know what Paul's appetite is like, he'll buy a big pizza and we'll just scav off him"

    "This is my bottle of coke, and nobody is gonna scav any off me, right?!"

    Also Paul, considering the "B" and the "V" are right next to each other on the keyboard I am pretty sure it was a typo.
    Oh, and on a side-note, someone who takes and never gives, can be called "a scav" as a noun.
     

    Tatzingo

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I've never heard of scab off. The one I'm used to hearing and conjugating is "to scrounge off".

    I scrounge off him
    You scrounge off me
    He's a scrounger

    Tatz.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I don't think "scab off" exists Tatz:p
    I think people tried to make sense out of Paul's typo and try to link it to the meaning.
    If I remember correctly you live in Manchester, right? I'd expect "scav" to be known there as well as Liverpool.
    Hmm, maybe it's not as common as I realised.
     

    Tatzingo

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I don't think "scab off" exists Tatz:p
    I think people tried to make sense out of Paul's typo and try to link it to the meaning.
    If I remember correctly you live in Manchester, right? I'd expect "scav" to be known there as well as Liverpool.
    Hmm, maybe it's not as common as I realised.
    Ah, my Liverpudlian friend, right? ;-)

    I mean't to say that I'd never heard of to scav off (just copied scab from 1st post) but now that I think about it, I think i may have done somewhere...

    Tatz.

    Ps. That's it! I've heard of scav as a noun, someone that scrounges off another, but I'd never heard of "to scav off" as a verb before.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I think that's highly plausible MQ. I would also say that "scab off" is used, but is a mis-hearing of "scav off". This does happen with slang as it is primarily oral in nature.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Scab is used in Australia.

    I'm good at scabbing cigarettes and free beer.

    I am broke but my tight arse mates still scab off me.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Given that Se16Teddy (from London) hasn't heard of it, I'm more inclined to believe that "scav" is a term used in the north of England. Tatz.
    I'm not from London, I'm from Yorkshire but living in London. And contributors to this forum have sometimes had occasion to comment that I don't seem to have my finger on the pulse of the latest vernacular.
     

    Tatzingo

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I'm not from London, I'm from Yorkshire but living in London. And contributors to this forum have sometimes had occasion to comment that I don't seem to have my finger on the pulse of the latest vernacular.
    Ah! My apologies for accusing you of being a Londoner! :eek: - i misread the Location on your post.

    Tatz.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Leech -> OED -2. intr. Const. on (to). To attach oneself like a leech; to be parasitic on. Also const. off.

    "1937 R. K. Narayan Bachelor of Arts xiv. 201 It was nearly two years since he left college, and he was still leeching on his father."

    Leach -> 3. a. trans. To cause (a liquid) to percolate through some material.
     
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