Scavalcare

rom_itn

Senior Member
Sri Lanka - Sinhalese
Ciao a tutti,
I've already checked the dictionary for the verb and it says that scavalcare means to dismount from a horse.
But the funny part is I heard this during a football commentry!
I don't remember the situation where the speaker used it so I'm cluless.:confused:
Help me out of here!
Rom :)
 
  • Manuel_M

    Senior Member
    Maltese
    in fotballi terms scavlcare can be used to describe the ball 'going over' on eof the lines or the defensive line (la barriera) in a freekick situation.

    es. il calcio di punizione di Del Piero scavalca la barriera e batte imparabilmente il portiere Romanista ( are you there, Vittorio?;) )
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Rom, si vede che non faccio equitazione... perché scavalcare in quel senso (scendere da cavallo) è secondo me il meno usato in assoluto.

    Il significato più comune è figurativo:
    scavalcare qualcuno = bypass someone

    Diffuso anche climb over e step over.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Can it mean "go behind someone's back"?
    Someone's just said it on TV and it was after the boyfriend went to talk to his girlfriend's friend and told him to "back off" (and she didn't know). She's just found out and shouted "Mi scavalchi??" at him.

    I just wanted to check that was what it meant.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Actually the situation is not very clear to me, but maybe to oust?
    :eek: That only works with like, a king or a president, or someone who is in office. I can't think of any colloquial situation that oust would be used in.

    But as the dictionaries say, "bypass someone" is correct, which seemed a little bit like going behind someone's back / doing something without the other person knowing (but has a direct influence on the person you're hiding something from).

    So A and B are boyfriend/girlfriend (respectively), and B has a good guy friend C, but A thinks that C actually likes B and finds C when he is alone and threatens him, then when B finds out, she's angry and says this.

    Basically "You did this without me knowing", is the same thing as going behind someone's back, is that the meaning of scavalcare here?
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    That's the reason why it's not clear to me: scavalcare has not the meaning of "go behind someone's back", as far as I know. Here the meaning in your case, from Treccani:
    scavalcare un superiore, un collega, prendere arbitrariamente un’iniziativa, una decisione che spetterebbe prendere a lui, o per lo meno senza chiederne il consenso.
     
    Last edited:

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    More or less, because my poor English, the meaning is to take arbitrarily an initiative, a decision, that is due to somebody else, or at least without asking him the consent.
     
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