sceneggiato televisivo

miralo

Senior Member
Ciao - In an Italian instruction book, I ran across the following sentence. Alla TV guardo lo sceneggiato televisivo. I think it means: On TV I watch television drama. But I could not find sceneggiato in the WordReference dictionary or any other dictionary I have access to. Is my translation correct?

Grazie
 
  • spero

    Senior Member
    english (USA)
    programmi scenneggiati
    uno spettacolo scenneggiato

    Both of these terms are used in an article that talks exclusively about TV programming.

    I have translated "scenneggiato" as miniseries, but would like confirmation.

    Thanks!
     

    King Crimson

    Modus in fabula
    Italiano
    programmi scenneggiati
    uno spettacolo scenneggiato

    Both of these terms are used in an article that talks exclusively about TV programming.

    I have translated "scenneggiato" as miniseries, but would like confirmation.

    Thanks!

    Sansoni gives (TV) serial or series, while Garzanti gives (TV) serial, so I think your option could work.
    Strange as it may seem, however, the word "sceneggiato" is fading out nowadays in Italy, to be replaced by (TV) fiction, which I believe to be one of those words mistakenly borrowed from English to mean something different from the original.
     

    PublicJohnDoe

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I would use "miniseries" only if it's very limited in scope (like Masters of Science Fiction for example, only 6 episodes), and "serial" or "series" if it's longer.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Maybe it's only me, but I think series and serial mean different things. I'd say a serial if each episode is the continuation of a single story, while series could mean a different, complete story each week.

    King Crimson is right about fiction, which really means fantasia, something invented. When it's about a historical fact, it's not logical to call it fiction.
     

    PublicJohnDoe

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Maybe it's only me, but I think series and serial mean different things. I'd say a serial if each episode is the continuation of a single story, while series could mean a different, complete story each week.
    I've found this definition for "serial" as a noun on my Merriam-Webster:
    "a work appearing (as in a magazine or on television) in parts at intervals"

    I guess the two terms are more or like interchangeable... otherwise for example 24 should be called a "serial" (as the whole season is a single day, and each episode strictly continues what happened in the episode before) and CSI:Miami a "series" (as its continuity is much looser)...
     
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