scheiden (verb)

paradoxa4

Senior Member
Venezuelan Spanish
Hello everyone.

I want to know the opinion of a German, when a person says "Ich scheide" do you all start to make fun of him/her? The reason is too obvious...

Is there another way to say "Separate" in German without being teased?

Thanks in advance... XD hahaha :p:p:p
 
  • Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    I want to know the opinion of a German, when a person says "Ich scheide" do you all start to make fun of him/her? The reason is too obvious...
    I can't see anything obvious here:
    Nobody uses the verb "scheiden" in modern German other than in

    By the way: In the first (judicial) case, unlike its opposite heiraten, "scheiden" is nothing that two people can decide to do by themselves; it is always "sich scheiden lassen".

    I wonder why wortschatz.uni-leipzig.de, lists "scheiden" as using the past participle with both "sein" and "haben". This is clearly a mistake: As a transitive verb the compound past tenses of "scheiden" have to be formed with "haben" always.

    "Ich bin geschieden" is merely the stative passive of its agentive equivalent "ich bin geschieden worden", but:
    Das Amtsgericht - Familiengericht - hat die Ehe der Parteien geschieden.
     
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    Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Is that why it's funny to you? Because there is a noun with the same spelling?
    The spelling is no coincidence at all. Both, the noun "Scheide" (literally: "skeath") and the verb "scheiden" share a common origin:
    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=sheath
    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=shed

    I'm glad that Austin Powers didn't have to have a complicated divorce after his short hot-tub adventure with Alotta Fagina and that he could part almost in peace instead.
     

    fiesebrille

    Member
    German
    Well, it would sound a bit weird to me, if someone says "Ich scheide" because it's antiquated. But if we would make fun of you.... no, I don't think so.
     

    jugen

    Senior Member
    English USA
    This interchange has helped me understand the term verschieden ist in a notice in Aufbau regarding the death of a relative at Terezin.
    ~jugen
     

    Dan2

    Senior Member
    US
    English (US)
    This interchange has helped me understand the term verschieden ist in a notice in Aufbau regarding the death of a relative at Terezin.
    ~jugen
    Since there have been a lot of posts in this thread that make assumptions about what others are thinking without stating them explicitly, let me try to summarize:

    "scheiden" is a verb that used in expressions meaning "to divorce". One of its forms is "scheide"
    The noun "Scheide" (sing), "Scheiden" (plural), of identical pronunciation to the verb, is an anatomical term.
    The original poster wanted to know if this homophony led to mockery.
    Additional posts discussed how the verb is actually used.

    A quite separate verb, "verscheiden", means "to die"
    Its past form is "ist verschieden" or "verschieden ist" (depending on context) and means "died" or "passed away".

    If you need more help with your death notice, I'm sure someone here can help you.
     
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    Kurtchen

    Senior Member
    German - Norddeutschland
    It may cause giggling among fifth graders, but that is to be expected. However, there is an overwhelming number of phrases and compounds in non-sexual contexts you are far more likely to encounter as an adult eg. Wegscheide, Scheidewasser, Wasserscheide, Schwertscheide, not to mention derivations such as abscheiden, Ausscheidung etc, so it never really becomes an issue. :)
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    The noun "Scheide" (sing), "Scheiden" (plural), of identical pronunciation to the verb, is an anatomical term.
    This is actually a euphemism to avoid more direct language. The literal meaning of Scheide is sheath (for a sword). This literal meaning is still in use and sentences like Der Kampf war beendet und der Ritter steckte sein Schwert wieder in die Scheide do not cause any teasing or giggling (except maybe among fifth-graders as Kurtchen said).
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Since there have been a lot of posts in this thread that make assumptions about what others are thinking without stating them explicitly, let me try to summarize:

    "scheiden" is a verb that used in expressions meaning "to divorce". One of its forms is "scheide"
    The noun "Scheide" (sing), "Scheiden" (plural), of identical pronunciation to the verb, is an anatomical term.
    The original poster wanted to know if this homophony led to mockery.
    Additional posts discussed how the verb is actually used.

    A quite separate verb, "verscheiden", means "to die"
    Its past form is "ist verschieden" or "verschieden ist" (depending on context) and means "died" or "passed away".

    If you need more help with your death notice, I'm sure someone here can help you.
    Nobody thinks about "die Scheide" in the given context. (May be in a play you can say figuratively "ich Scheide - du Pullermann" - grammatically like "Ich Tarzan - Du Jane" to indicate that you speak very bad German or are in a very early state of language development - but this is an extremely restricted situation.)

    "Scheiden" as verb in human relations has two meanings, as we already know:
    1. in forms like "ich scheide" it is an antiqated or elaborated way to say "I'll go now."
    2. in the form "wir lassen uns scheiden" or "wir sind geschieden" or "ich bin geschieden" it is a way to speak about divourcing.

    If you say "Ich scheide" to say "I go now" and they do not recognise the language joke it can indeed cause mockery "hochgestochene, unangemessene Sprechweise".
    This may occur especially if you speak German as beginner, and the group is not the one you want to be member of.

    It can also cause some smile, in the way when children learn their language and say something strange which is strictly logically but usually not used.
     
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