Schlag ein!

Whodunit

Senior Member
Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
Hi native English speakers who are fluent in passive German ;) ,

I have a question about the word "Schlag ein!" We teenies use it when someone doesn't want to say "Gi'me five!"

Do you get it? :)

Everyone knows what "Gi'me five!" means, but I'm looking for other variants like in German:

Schlag ein, (Alter)!
Klatsch ein!

Here you can see what I mean, an I'd really appreciate if you could translate it.
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    Hi native English spekers who are fluent in passive German ;) ,

    I have a question about the word "Schlag ein!" We teenies use it when someone doesn't want to say "Gi'me five!"

    Do you get it? :)

    Everyone knows what "Gi'me five!" means, but I'm looking for other variants like in German:

    Schlag ein, (Alter)!
    Klatsch ein!

    Here you can see what I mean, an I'd really appreciate if you could translate it.
    You can also say "High five!"
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    elroy said:
    You can also say "High five!"
    OKay, thank you very much. Next question related to this topic:

    If you pass a person whose friend you are, you can "clap your hand into the other's one", in German "abklatschen"; how would you call this action in English? You'll also see this action relay race without such a (two-tone) club. The relay runner usually "clap his hand into the other's one". Do you know what I mean?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    OKay, thank you very much. Next question related to this topic:

    If you pass a friend, you can "clap your hand into his", in German "abklatschen"; how would you call this action in English? You'll also see this action in a relay race, in which there is no baton. The relay runner usually "claps his hand into the other player's". Do you know what I mean?
    Yes, I know exactly what you mean. However, I don't know if there's a specific all-encompassing term for that.

    In a relay race you would usually use the verb "to tag," so you can say "tag the other player's hand."

    In wrestling the old player and the new player "tag in" when they perform this action.

    As for doing this when you pass a friend on the street, I don't know because I don't personally do that and I can't say I know people that do! :)

    I'd be interested to hear if other people know of more specific terminology.
     

    mnzrob

    Senior Member
    Chicago English and German
    Whodunit said:
    Hi native English spekers who are fluent in passive German ;) ,

    I have a question about the word "Schlag ein!" We teenies use it when someone doesn't want to say "Gi'me five!"

    Do you get it? :)

    Everyone knows what "Gi'me five!" means, but I'm looking for other variants like in German:

    Schlag ein, (Alter)!
    Klatsch ein!

    Here you can see what I mean, an I'd really appreciate if you could translate it.
    Instead of Gimme Five, you could say
    Put 'er there (put her there)
    Slap me some skin
    Gimme some skin
    Up high (when you say this, you have to put your hand up high)
    Down low (when you say this, hold your hand low)

    Hmm, there are probably some more, I'll let you know if i think of them.

    Whodunit said:
    If you pass a person whose friend you are, you can "clap your hand into the other's one", in German "abklatschen"; how would you call this action in English? You'll also see this action relay race without such a (two-tone) club. The relay runner usually "clap his hand into the other's one". Do you know what I mean?
    Like elroy said, in a race or wrestling it's called tagging.
    If you pass a friend in the hall at school, you give each other five. That's what I would call it. I guess you could say you would slap hands, but that sounds kinda weird. In my experience, it's always referred to as "giving each other five."

    Rob
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Instead of Gimme Five, you could say
    Put 'er there (put her there)
    Slap me some skin
    Gimme some skin
    Up high (when you say this, you have to put your hand up high)
    Down low (when you say this, hold your hand low)

    Hmm, there are probably some more, I'll let you know if i think of them.
    Wow, what long list! I knew "up high" and "down low" but I definitely didn't know any of the other three! :)


    Like elroy said, in a race or wrestling it's called tagging.
    If you pass a friend in the hall at school, you give each other five. That's what I would call it. I guess you could say you would slap hands, but that sounds kinda weird. In my experience, it's always referred to as "giving each other five."

    Rob
    I think he's looking for a different term for that particular action, since apparently German has one. But like I said, I don't know one besides "gimme five," as you said. I haven't heard "slap hands" either... Hm, I wonder if it's just that it's not done as often as it is in Germany???
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I've recently found the following equivalents. Could someone check if they're used, please?

    Gimme some skin! (already proposed)
    Gimme some slap! (already proposed)
    Gimme a touch!
    Gimme a fist!
    What's crackin'?
    What's poppin'?
    How's it hanging?
    Hey!
    What's up? (==> Whazzup?)

    In French:
    Tope-là!

    In Spanish:
    ¡Choca esos cinco!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    I've recently found the following equivalents. Could someone check if they're used, please?

    Gimme some skin! (already proposed)
    Gimme some slap! (already proposed)
    Gimme a touch!
    Gimme a fist!

    What's crackin'?
    What's poppin'?
    How's it hanging?
    Hey!
    What's up? (==> Whazzup?)


    In French:
    Tope-là!

    In Spanish:
    ¡Choca esos cinco!
    The ones in green I personally haven't heard.

    The ones in red are used but not necessarily when you "abklatschen" somebody. You can use them just as ordinary greetings.

    I'm not familiar with the French or the Spanish.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top