Schnaksi

vbergen

Senior Member
Spanish, espagnol, español de América
Hello, I'm reading a History book and I found this:
"Public demonstrations of love and affection were not for public display for them, and so it was seen as very significant when in the presence of others he called her "Schnaksi" one day...".

I thought maybe it was "Schatzi" misspelled, but it mentions the fact that he called her like that three times in the book. I can't find the meaning so far.
 
  • manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    The question is how common is this in southern Germany/Austria when it first entered the Duden in 2004.

    Oh, I'd say, "schnackseln" is very very common in South Germany and Austria -- in Gedanken, Worten und Werken, so to speak. Even before 2004...! I did take it upon myself to research that subject in detail since early puberty (with varying results)... :D

    But seriously, "Schnaksi" as a 'Kosename' has absolutely nothing to do with "schnackseln" - that would be rude, vulgar, and seriously degrading!
    I have no idea where it comes from, but it just sounds cute and more personal than the common "Schatzi", Mausi, Baby etc.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Es gibt auch "Schnucki(e)" ... und "Schnuckums", oder, maybe I'm imagining that.

    EDIT: Okay, I was half imagining. "Schnucki" seems to be German. "Schnuckums" looks to be American English. Both may be of Yiddish origin.
     
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    vbergen

    Senior Member
    Spanish, espagnol, español de América
    I have no idea where it comes from

    :oops: according to Heinz Linge on his book, "Schnaksi" is how Adolf called Eva in private.
    It is clear to me now, that it was not a typo, and that it is a bad word. I guess it would translate like fvck4bl3.
    I apologize if it was inappropriate to ask the meaning here. :oops:
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    It is clear to me now, that it was not a typo, and that it is a bad word. I guess it would translate like fvck4bl3.
    I apologize if it was inappropriate to ask the meaning here. :oops:

    No need to apologize. This is a language forum and not a convent school for girls. There are no "bad words" and as manfy explained, it's unclear whether "Schnaksi" is related to "schnackseln" at all.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    ..., and that it is a bad word. I guess it would translate like fvck4bl3.

    Definitely not!!
    If it had that connotation of copulation, it would be unacceptable to use it in public, except as a swear word, of course.
    The way it is used here is clearly as a pet name, a term of endearment.

    I can think of one potential source of "Schnaksi" and that's "schnackerln". That's a southern, colloquial term for having a hiccup. I met a girl once with a nervous tick - whenever she got emotionally excited, she started blinking and twitching with her eyes - inadvertently and uncontrollably. I guess, the same could happen with a hiccup.
    I see this as a very cute, unique, and funny peculiarity and I might be inclined to call that girl "Schnaksi" as an equally funny and unique term of endearment, just like the trait itself.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Well, the question is whether anyone besides Hitler uses/used this phrase: Schnaksi.

    < ... > Unnecessary comment removed (WRF rule 2)
     
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    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    But seriously, "Schnaksi" as a 'Kosename' has absolutely nothing to do with "schnackseln" - that would be rude, vulgar, and seriously degrading!
    Well, I have absolutely no problems believing that Hitler may have used seriously degrading words....
     
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