School Work or Schoolwork?

Dori1984

New Member
Croatian
I work as an English teacher and have been taught the correct way of writing it is Schoolwork. However, I worked as a substitute teacher and children told me their teacher taught them to write School Work and now I'm quite confused. Let me explain this: sometimes when we do an exercise and children have to put a title in their notebooks we, English teachers in my country, tell them to write Schoolwork (or School Work) as a title. Which one is correct?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In general we would think of "schoolwork" as one word, although we could separate it into two words if there were a particular reason to do so. I'm less clear as to why you're using "schoolwork" as the title of a specific exercise.
     
    Hi.

    This is tricky because I think it gets into not just language issues but perhaps cultural differences as well.

    I also would think of 'schoolwork" as one word. On the other hand, I'm not sure what it means. :rolleyes:

    Is that something that needs to be tracked as "work done at school" as opposed to "homework"?

    Naturally, only the use of it as a title would justify capitalization.
     

    Dori1984

    New Member
    Croatian
    I know it's tricky and it's hard to explain it. I don't really trust this teacher in whose class I taught because, in my opinion, she isn't fully qualified to be a teacher.
    To explain this title, I'll use this: if there is a specific lesson to be taught, for example A World Today and a World Tomorrow, then we would write it as a title. If we aren't doing it but, for example, practise vocabulary, we'd write Schoolwork or School Work. Does it make any sense?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... if there is a specific lesson to be taught, for example A World Today and a World Tomorrow, then we would write it as a title. If we aren't doing it but, for example, practise vocabulary, we'd write Schoolwork or School Work. Does it make any sense?
    It still seems odd to me. It's like writing "E-mail message" in the subject line of an e-mail message, or titling a thread here "Question about English." What else could an e-mail, or a thread in the English Only forum, possibly be? In this example, "Vocabulary Practice" would be a good title.
     

    Dori1984

    New Member
    Croatian
    I totally agree but it's deeply rooted in our tradition. We have been taught to put a title Schoolwork since we were at school (I've been learning English since I was 10 and teaching it for 6 years). We write Schoolwork even in Croatian when we're learning something in general.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    There's schoolwork and there's homework.

    Homework should be a re-inforcement of schoolwork and more importantly, a way for the teacher to see which pupils need help and how the teaching can be improved.

    It's hard when you know you are right!
    I can't understand the situation but no matter. We had exercise books for homework and separate ones for 'schoolwork', or what I suggest is a more usual term, 'classwork'.
    Sometimes we used our classwork book for homework, for example for grammar exercises, but that was when there was no photocopying.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Which one is correct?
    The following are all "correct":
    school work
    school-work
    schoolwork
    Like many compound nouns, the form is in a process of evolution, and has yet to complete its journey from two words to one word. It is very nearly there, so nobody could reasonably object to "homework". Preferring "home work" in a school context could be regarded as perverse. "Homework" made the transition long ago, probably because its original meaning had nothing to do with schools, but related to work to earn a living.
     
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