score points <with/from> your boss [preposition]

Joika

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone,

I find with is used where I thought could be from in several phrases about gaining favour.

For example:
a. I will score more points with my boss by running this errand.
b. If you want to curry favour with me, don't mention that.


I think it also makes a lot of sense to use from because either the boss in a) or the speaker in b) are the ones in the position of dispensing favours. Would you tell me why with is the good fit? Is there a deeper level of meaning that I haven't grasped?

Thank you!!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Would you tell me why with is the good fit? Is there a deeper level of meaning that I haven't grasped?
    Perhaps there is. With suggests the idea that the boss or whoever keeps a little scorecard upon which he marks points in your favor. If you score points with the boss, the boss remembers positive things that you have done.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    "Points" are items in a score. If you score 100 points on a test in school, your final score is 100 (an A). If you score 75 points, your final score is 75 (a C). Sometimes a bonus question "is worth 10 points" or "adds 10 points to your score".

    a. I will score more points with my boss by running this errand.
    I think it also makes a lot of sense to use from because either the boss in a) or the speaker in b) are the ones in the position of dispensing favours.
    Points are not favors. If you score points with your boss, he gives you nothing. So "from" doesn't make any sense. "From your boss" means "received from your boss". But you did not receive anything. That is not what "scoring points" means.

    Instead, if you score points with your boss, your total score (with your boss = in your boss's mind) gets higher. That is all that happens.
     

    Joika

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you both! I initially pictured the boss giving metaphoric points (and so the advantage or favour in a working setting that will come along with those points) to the employee somewhat like "my professor gave me an A-".

    Now I get it that I should rather imagine a screen or something in front of the employee that shows the points, which correspond to how the boss thinks of them, right? "with", in this context, indicates relationship rather than an exchange.:thank you:
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't know how it came to be, but "with" essentially means "in his/her/their/my mind".

    a. I will score more points with my boss in my boss's mind by running this errand.
    b. If you want to curry favour with me in my mind, don't mention that.
     
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