Scottish shortening of Allhallow-even "Eve of All Saints

Unoverwordinesslogged

Banned
English - Britain
Halloween (n.)

also Hallow-e'en, c. 1745, Scottish shortening of Allhallow-even "Eve of All Saints, last night of October" (1550s), the last night of the year in the old Celtic calendar, where it was Old Year's Night, a night for witches. A pagan holiday given a cursory baptism. See hallow (n.) + even (n.); also see hallows. Hallow-day for "All-Saints'" is from 1590s.
Does "Scottish shortening" hereinabove mean it is definately from 'Scottish-English' or is it a sloppy way of saying it from that other offshoot of standard English Scots? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_English
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_English
https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Scots_language
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    The etymology given tells you that it predates modern Scottish English, which means it must have been used in Scots.
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

    Banned
    English - Britain
    The etymology given tells you that it predates modern Scottish English, which means it must have been used in Scots.
    I don't understand - is it the dates? Why have you brought up 'modern' Scottish English? Anyway, why doesn't it read something like: 'Scots shortening of Allhallow-even' instead of 'Scottish' ?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Yes it's the dates.
    The etymology given indicates that the term was first seen in Scotland, and can thus be considered Scottish. You could only be sure that it was Scots if you knew precisely who first used it and that they were speaking Scots at the time. Scotland was a multilingual environment - many people using both Scots and English until these effectively merged into Scottish English during the eighteenth century.
     
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