scream into

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WildWest

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi. I have a question about the following, which is from a book.

"Police cars screamed into the street."

I can understand it. The police cars appeared on the street suddenly with their sirens screaming. They moved into the street. However, I'm used to seeing into along with verbs indicating movement. For example:

"He escorted her into the building."
"The yacht sailed into the harbour."

The verb "scream" doesn't have that sense. At least to me. Is it really possible to use into that way?
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    What kind of a book did you read this in?

    All I can say is that I find it a most unusual use of scream (and I don't like it :)).
    If you like, I am prejudiced against it.

    Vehicles can indeed scream, e.g. the ambulance screamed to a halt.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    What kind of a book did you read this in?

    All I can say is that I find it a most unusual use of scream (and I don't like it :)).
    If you like, I am prejudiced against it.

    Vehicles can indeed scream, e.g. the ambulance screamed to a halt.
    Well, I came across it in a book simplified for learners and published by Penguin Readers.

    So you have no problems with into, but some with the use of scream?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's the sort of phrase I would expect to see in pulp or low-quality fiction.
    What I don't like is scream into in the sense of suddenly appearing in the street, with sirens screaming. But some people might regard it as imaginative writing,

    That said, I found "I wondered what was going on when police, ambulances and fire engines screamed into the street." (DIY dad impaled on his own ladder). This newspaper is a tabloid.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thank you for the reply.

    Some typos in the book caught my eye as I was reading. That's why I felt suspicious about its correctness. Does it sound strange to Americans too? Is it possible it's more common across the Atlantic?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    All I can say is that I find it a most unusual use of scream (and I don't like it :)).
    If you like, I am prejudiced against it.
    It's perhaps not exactly exemplary style, but it's perfectly acceptable. It just means they made a screaming noise while they entered the street. It seems apt if more people are likely to hear than see their arrival.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thanks, Edinburgher. I just found it strange to see into used with a verb that doesn't indicate movement.

    Well, it can be used as in "I'm into basketball." or in some other context. In the first sentence there is nothing to show any movement.
     
    It's perhaps not exactly exemplary style, but it's perfectly acceptable. It just means they made a screaming noise while they entered the street. :thumbsup:It seems apt if more people are likely to hear:thumbsup: than see their arrival.
    I agree. Poetic license, not a standard thing, you were right to question it.

    I'll invent another example: "Ambulances roared out of the hospital garage and screamed into the street(s)."

    (Maybe no one saw any movement into, but they sure heard the motion and path of the sound waves travelling. :))

    Plus, we can scream into the wind, (set phrase) and we drive our cars into our driveways, and back out in reverse into the street, so...
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I'll invent another example: "Ambulances roared out of the hospital garage and screamed into the street(s)."

    (Maybe no one saw any movement into, but they sure heard the motion and path of the sound waves travelling. :))
    Thanks, Dale. This now makes sense to me. We don't have to see the movement each time, but we can hear something approaching or leaving.
     
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