scream + Obj

Jeepster

Senior Member
From behind: “MIAMI POLICE! NOBODY MOVES!” and “Miami Police! Nobody moves!” sounded out in a curious atonal
harmony. It was Nuñez and García, coming in through the front door. Two more babies started wailing, making three in all. It was damned disorienting. Here was stern Sergeant Jorge Hernandez’s big baritone voice saying, “You’re under arrest! You’re selling drugs!” And a choral response of wailing babies, sometimes three, sometimes two . . . when one of the trio goes into a terrifying paroxysmal silence — seconds go by — will she ever come out of it or will her little lungs burst? . . . and then she comes out of it — fully recharged — screaming bloody infanticide . . .

Tom Wolfe. Back to Blood

My question is: should the phrase be interpreted as screaming/complaining (about) bloody infanticide or screaming/calling (for) bloody infanticide

Thank everyone
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    There is an idiom "to scream blue murder", i.e. "to scream very loudly as though you are being murdered, or to let people know that you are being murdered." These babies were screaming so much that it sounded as though they were letting everyone know that someone was murdering them, and in a bloody way.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There is an idiom "to scream blue murder", i.e. "to scream very loudly as though you are being murdered, or to let people know that you are being murdered."
    In American English, the idiom is "to scream bloody murder" so there's no need to explain the "bloody" part. :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thanks for that Myridon. I looked further into it and according to Wiktionary the source of the phrase is French and it means "to protest loudly or angrily".
     
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